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Rosario Giuliani: Mr. Dodo

Jim Santella By

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His lyrical interpretations keep Rosario Giuliani on the sunny side throughout this latest session. His quartet’s dramatic, modern mainstream drive and flowing ballad poise combine to create a program balanced in all ways. Giuliani’s tight accompaniment wraps it all up in one neat package. From Italy’s central region, just south of Rome, the saxophonist studied at L. Refice Conservatory of Music in Frosinone. In his early twenties, Giuliani joined the European Jazz Orchestra. A handful of recordings as leader has followed; each moving in the direction of modern jazz saxophonists such as John Coltrane, Phil Woods, Jackie McLean and Wayne Shorter. Rosario Giuliani swings “Monsieur F.D.” in the manner of Cannonball Adderley. His natural affinity for lyrical ballads warms the heart. Walking bass, swirling brushes, and a complementary pianist paint pastoral scenes. Giuliani contrasts that with a blistering adventure on “Mimi,” his original piece designed to stir the emotions from an opposing direction. On this daring, straight-ahead romp, the foursome churns with serious designs. Highly recommended, Mr. Dodo offers modern mainstream variety from a superb quartet. Saxophonist Giuliani plays a major role in the worldwide campaign to keep jazz growing by leaps and bounds.

Track Listing: Mr. Dodo; September; Home; By Night Forever; The Blessing; Francy

Personnel: Rosario Giuliani- alto saxophone, soprano saxophone on

Title: Mr. Dodo | Year Released: 2002 | Record Label: Dreyfus Records


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