176

Rich Halley: Mountains And Plains

Mark Corroto By

Sign in to view read count
Rich Halley: Mountains And Plains This latest release comes from saxophonist Rich Halley's working trio. The term "working trio" denotes several things in jazz. First, it literally designates Halley, bassist Clyde Reed, and drummer Dave Storrs as a band you might catch live in their native Northwest. Second, it implies that the members of this trio share a common approach and musical language. Third, it suggests this will be a quality recording.

That designation is correct on all three counts.

Just like on its previous discs, Objects (2002), Coyotes In The City (2001), and The Blue Rims (2003, with Bobby Bradford), the band approaches modern music with a an openness to time and timing. Take "The Rub, with its Latin opening and odd-timed fizzled funk ending. In between, the trio plays with differing time measures, slowing the affair and swirling the mind. Is this tune ever played the same way twice? Probably not, but you get a sense that the members of the trio are comfortable finishing each other's sentences.

You can focus your attention on any of the three players and enjoy this disc. Reed's walking bass on the opening track and his repetition on "Long Valley are intoxicating. Likewise, Storrs can be a minimalist drummer (as on "Three Way Shapes ) or quite the expansive player. His hand drumming, whistling, and sometimes singing fill the moment like Charles Mingus' comment.

Unlike Halley's other discs, Mountains and Plains adds a bit more space to the tracks. His saxophone, in the post-Coltrane lineage, is full and quite fertile. He even takes up a Lacy-like soprano on "Before Dawn, probing alleys and backstreets with frequent pauses while his partners check other passageways.

Give Rich Halley's new trio recording an ovation for its hard work. Well done.


Track Listing: Problematic; Long Valley; The Rub; Before Dawn; Three Way Shapes; Mountains And Plains; Intermountain Rhumba; Distant Peaks; Winter Sky.

Personnel: Rich Halley: tenor and soprano saxophones, percussion; Clyde Reed: bass; Dave Storrs: drums, pecussion, vocals.

Year Released: 2005 | Record Label: Louie Records | Style: Modern Jazz


Shop

More Articles

Read Acceptance CD/LP/Track Review Acceptance
by Tyran Grillo
Published: February 26, 2017
Read The Wild CD/LP/Track Review The Wild
by Dan McClenaghan
Published: February 26, 2017
Read This Is Nate Najar CD/LP/Track Review This Is Nate Najar
by Edward Blanco
Published: February 26, 2017
Read Joy Comes Back CD/LP/Track Review Joy Comes Back
by James Nadal
Published: February 26, 2017
Read Apocalypse CD/LP/Track Review Apocalypse
by Julian Derry
Published: February 26, 2017
Read The Sound of Surprise: Live at the Side Door CD/LP/Track Review The Sound of Surprise: Live at the Side Door
by Edward Blanco
Published: February 25, 2017
Read "Michael Shrieve's Spellbinder" CD/LP/Track Review Michael Shrieve's Spellbinder
by Doug Collette
Published: August 17, 2016
Read "Oblique Mirrors" CD/LP/Track Review Oblique Mirrors
by Mark Corroto
Published: April 9, 2016
Read "Prog Noir" CD/LP/Track Review Prog Noir
by Glenn Astarita
Published: November 3, 2016
Read "The Motorman's Son" CD/LP/Track Review The Motorman's Son
by Dan Bilawsky
Published: February 18, 2017
Read "Jersey" CD/LP/Track Review Jersey
by Hrayr Attarian
Published: July 9, 2016
Read "The Angel and the Brute Sing Songs of Rapture" CD/LP/Track Review The Angel and the Brute Sing Songs of Rapture
by Karl Ackermann
Published: February 25, 2017

Post a comment

comments powered by Disqus

Sponsor: Jazz Near You | GET IT  

Support our sponsor

Support All About Jazz's Future

We need your help and we have a deal. Contribute $20 and we'll hide the six Google ads that appear on every page for a full year!

Buy it!