Learn How

We need your help in 2018

Support All About Jazz All About Jazz is looking for 1,000 backers to help fund our 2018 projects that directly support jazz. You can make this happen by purchasing ad space or by making a donation to our fund drive. In addition to completing every project (listed here), we'll also hide all Google ads and present exclusive content for a full year!

176

Rich Halley: Mountains And Plains

Mark Corroto By

Sign in to view read count
This latest release comes from saxophonist Rich Halley's working trio. The term "working trio" denotes several things in jazz. First, it literally designates Halley, bassist Clyde Reed, and drummer Dave Storrs as a band you might catch live in their native Northwest. Second, it implies that the members of this trio share a common approach and musical language. Third, it suggests this will be a quality recording.

That designation is correct on all three counts.

Just like on its previous discs, Objects (2002), Coyotes In The City (2001), and The Blue Rims (2003, with Bobby Bradford), the band approaches modern music with a an openness to time and timing. Take "The Rub, with its Latin opening and odd-timed fizzled funk ending. In between, the trio plays with differing time measures, slowing the affair and swirling the mind. Is this tune ever played the same way twice? Probably not, but you get a sense that the members of the trio are comfortable finishing each other's sentences.

You can focus your attention on any of the three players and enjoy this disc. Reed's walking bass on the opening track and his repetition on "Long Valley are intoxicating. Likewise, Storrs can be a minimalist drummer (as on "Three Way Shapes ) or quite the expansive player. His hand drumming, whistling, and sometimes singing fill the moment like Charles Mingus' comment.

Unlike Halley's other discs, Mountains and Plains adds a bit more space to the tracks. His saxophone, in the post-Coltrane lineage, is full and quite fertile. He even takes up a Lacy-like soprano on "Before Dawn, probing alleys and backstreets with frequent pauses while his partners check other passageways.

Give Rich Halley's new trio recording an ovation for its hard work. Well done.


Track Listing: Problematic; Long Valley; The Rub; Before Dawn; Three Way Shapes; Mountains And Plains; Intermountain Rhumba; Distant Peaks; Winter Sky.

Personnel: Rich Halley: tenor and soprano saxophones, percussion; Clyde Reed: bass; Dave Storrs: drums, pecussion, vocals.

Title: Mountains And Plains | Year Released: 2005 | Record Label: Louie Records


Tags

comments powered by Disqus

More Articles

Read Shadow Work CD/LP/Track Review Shadow Work
by Phil Barnes
Published: November 22, 2017
Read Veterans of Jazz CD/LP/Track Review Veterans of Jazz
by Mark Sullivan
Published: November 22, 2017
Read Ariel CD/LP/Track Review Ariel
by Paul Rauch
Published: November 22, 2017
Read Fukushima CD/LP/Track Review Fukushima
by Dan McClenaghan
Published: November 22, 2017
Read Dedication CD/LP/Track Review Dedication
by Dan Bilawsky
Published: November 21, 2017
Read Surface of Inscription CD/LP/Track Review Surface of Inscription
by Glenn Astarita
Published: November 21, 2017
Read "Dreaming Spirits" CD/LP/Track Review Dreaming Spirits
by Kris Perdew
Published: October 27, 2017
Read "Hybrido - From Rio to Wayne Shorter" CD/LP/Track Review Hybrido - From Rio to Wayne Shorter
by C. Michael Bailey
Published: April 21, 2017
Read "Groovin' Hard: Live at the Penthouse 1964-1968" CD/LP/Track Review Groovin' Hard: Live at the Penthouse 1964-1968
by Chris M. Slawecki
Published: August 27, 2017
Read "Hudson" CD/LP/Track Review Hudson
by Roger Farbey
Published: June 18, 2017
Read "Dreamsville" CD/LP/Track Review Dreamsville
by Jack Bowers
Published: April 26, 2017
Read "Special Night" CD/LP/Track Review Special Night
by Jim Trageser
Published: November 25, 2016

Support All About Jazz's Future

We need your help and we have a deal. Contribute $20 and we'll hide the six Google ads that appear on every page for a full year!

Please support out sponsor