Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

10

Myriad3: Moons

Dan McClenaghan By

Sign in to view read count
Someone's always trying to take a tried and true format out on a new tangent. Consider the piano trio: Bill Evans introduced deep, classically-influenced harmonics and a democracy of instrumental input in the late fifties and early sixties. The Esbjorn Svennson Trio (e.s.t.) brought in classical, rock, pop and techno elements; The Bad Plus plays with avant-garde jazz and pop/rock influences, and they can be loud. Even the tried and true changes. It's all good; and some of it is great.

Myriad3, a forward-leaning piano trio out of Toronto, Canada, has released their fourth CD, Moons, taking the piano trio format on a modernistic tangent of their own. It's three stellar musicians—all of them superior tune smith's—who take on the form with an equilibrium of input, an energetic verve and intelligence, some catchy grooves and strong compositions, straight through.

"Counter of the Cumulus," the only non-original of the set, opens with a majestic bombast before shifting into a Nik Bärtsch-like groove. "Skeleton Key," from the pen of the group's pianist, Chris Donnelly, plays out as a rock dirge. Ernesto Cervini's drums shift from a muscular grandiosity to a whispered shuffle; Dan Fortin plays a yearning heartbeat to the pianist's delicate wind chimes, until the groove reasserts itself. A marvelously engaging, mood-shifting tune for the opening for an album.


,
Cervini's "Noyammas" has a dark, furtive quality, a beautiful avant-garde piece that evolves and changes shapes as it rides time's flow. Bassist Fortin's "Exhausted Clock" wraps the set up with a graceful, subdued ballad. Gorgeous and wistful, a small masterpiece of subtle three-way interplay.

Track Listing: Skeleton Key; Noyammas; Unnamed Cells; Storner; Peak Fall; Counter Of The Cumulus; Ameliasburg; Sketch 8; Moons; Brother Dom; Exhausted Clock.

Personnel: Chris Donnelly: piano, synth; upright bass, fretless, synth; Ernesto Cervini: drums, glockenspiel.

Title: Moons | Year Released: 2016 | Record Label: Alma Records

Tags

Watch

comments powered by Disqus

Shop for Music

Start your music shopping from All About Jazz and you'll support us in the process. Learn how.

Skeleton Key

Skeleton Key

Myriad3
Moons

Myriad

Myriad

Myriad3
Tell

Album Reviews
Extended Analysis
Album Reviews
  • Tell by Bruce Lindsay
Read more articles
Vera

Vera

Alma Records
2018

buy
Moons

Moons

Alma Records
2016

buy
The Where

The Where

Alma Records
2015

buy
The Where

The Where

Alma Records
2014

buy
Myriad 3: Tell

Myriad 3: Tell

Alma Records
2013

buy
Tell

Tell

Alma Records
2012

buy

Related Articles

Read Higher Album Reviews
Higher
By Tyran Grillo
May 26, 2019
Read The Unlonely Raindancer Album Reviews
The Unlonely Raindancer
By Matt Parker
May 26, 2019
Read Pyramid Scheme Album Reviews
Pyramid Scheme
By Mark Sullivan
May 26, 2019
Read Mosaismic Album Reviews
Mosaismic
By Mike Jurkovic
May 26, 2019
Read Caldera / Sky Islands Album Reviews
Caldera / Sky Islands
By Jakob Baekgaard
May 25, 2019
Read Baby, Please Come Home Album Reviews
Baby, Please Come Home
By Doug Collette
May 25, 2019
Read Reckless Heart Album Reviews
Reckless Heart
By Doug Collette
May 25, 2019