9

Monterey Jazz Festival 2014

Josef Woodard By

Sign in to view read count
The Monterey Jazz Festival has managed to reflect the vastness of jazz, from its most accessible and party-ambience-suitable to at least relative abstraction and outer limits. —Josef Woodard
Monterey Jazz Festival
Monterey County Fairgrounds
Monterey, CA
September 19-21, 2014

Working the Numbers, and Young People Going Deep

Numbers worked in mysterious, seemingly synchronistic ways at this year's Monterey Jazz Festival, which celebrated its 57th anniversary year partly by also respectfully toasting the 75th anniversary of the mighty Blue Note Records label. Of course, music and numbers enjoy a tight relationship, along with a certain numerological fixation, and that tidy numerical palindrome—57/75—gained further number-ized traction when the all-star gathering of young Blue Note artists opened its feisty set with the title tune of Wayne Shorter's Speak No Evil, certainly one of the landmark records in the Blue Note catalogue, and coincidentally was released 50 years ago.

This boldly talented pack of Blue Note-linked young lions went by the collective name Our Point of View, which could as easily been dubbed Our Points of View, for the respective individual thrusts of the artists—Robert Glasper, Ambrose Akinmusire, Marcus Strickland, Lionel Loueke, Derrick Hodge and Kendrick Scott—and also the multiple points of historicist and modernist, and populist views. New Blue Note head, hip pop producer Don Was, perched happily with post-hippie beatitude off to stage left, glowing with satisfaction at the finery and forward thinking nature of this representing faction of the label's current roster.

Just as Blue Note plays a formidable role in jazz history, so goes the Monterey festival, surely in the elite top ten list of jazz festivals in the world, and one which gives a healthy overview of what's happening at a given time in jazz—while reflecting the importance and informing echoes of the past. During director Tim Jackson's long and notable reign—has managed to reflect the vastness of jazz, from its most accessible and party-ambience-suitable to at least relative abstraction and outer limits.

Speaking of relative abstraction, for this listener, the high point of the weekend came with trumpeter-bandleader-new jazz avatar Ambrose Akinmusire's stunning set on the Night Club stage, his concepts and band sound honed by a few years investment of time and creative energy by now. No doubt, a personal anecdotal connection deepened the experience: I first heard Akinmusire on this stage, four years ago, before the release of the first of his now two Blue Note albums, When the Heart Emerges Glistening, and I had one of those rare, senses-seizing "who/what is that?!" epiphanies. Fast forward to 2014, and the release of another innovative, genre-defiant album, "the imagined saviour is far easier to paint," from which much of his Monterey set was derived. With his gymnastic register-leaping, painterly half-valve tones and other sonic nuances easily in reach, Akinmusire can sound virtuosic and emotional vulnerable, by turns, a rare blend of attributes, and brings to each solo a kind of conceptual approach. There is something uniquely intellectual yet visceral, bold yet sensuous, fluid character to the music Akinmusire is creating, a music grounded in jazz but headed to whereabouts not quite known or named.

Monterey itself has such rich deposits of jazz history to draw on that history often repeats and/or reframes itself on these grounds. This year, for instance, saw the return of a significant Monterey artist, Charles Lloyd, whose 1966 performance resulted in the best-selling album Forest Flower, and erected bridges between a pop audience and the stuff of jazz, while advancing the name and hipness quotient of the Monterey Jazz Festival. Lloyd, who was officially this year's "Showcase Artist" and what a radio pundit called a festival "poster boy," last played here in 2006, the 40th anniversary of the "Flower" phenom, and why they didn't wait two more years to register the 50th seems odd. But this is a luminous period for Lloyd, who is set as NEA Jazz Master for 2015, and has been scooping up plaudits and honors in his itinerant wake.

Lloyd, looking and sounding sharp at age 76, appeared in the smaller venues with his trio Sangam and in a duet with his newest pianist ally, Gerald Clayton, a flexible power broker at the keys, and a good new right hand pianist for Lloyd. On Sunday evening, when he hit the familiar big arena stage with his band, with pianist Jason Moran, bassist Reuben Rogers and drummer Eric Harland (one of the finest of the many Lloyd outfits over the years), the band's presence felt here and now, but with plenty of then stirred in: they did satisfy the crowd's desire to hear "Forest Flower," although Lloyd rarely plays the tune anymore, and the simmering extended end coda section sounded more subdued, more like heading into the sunset rather than bursting with promise at sunrise.

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

More Articles

Read Herbie Hancock at the Gaillard Center Music Hall Live Reviews Herbie Hancock at the Gaillard Center Music Hall
by Rob Rosenblum
Published: October 23, 2017
Read Redwood City Salsa Festival 2017 Live Reviews Redwood City Salsa Festival 2017
by Walter Atkins
Published: October 17, 2017
Read AJAZZGO Festival in Cali, Colombia Live Reviews AJAZZGO Festival in Cali, Colombia
by Mark Holston
Published: October 13, 2017
Read "Chris Oatts Quintet at Chris’ Jazz Cafe" Live Reviews Chris Oatts Quintet at Chris’ Jazz Cafe
by Victor L. Schermer
Published: June 26, 2017
Read "Shirlee Temper At The Empress Theatre" Live Reviews Shirlee Temper At The Empress Theatre
by Walter Atkins
Published: April 30, 2017
Read "SFJAZZ Collective at the Music Box Supper Club" Live Reviews SFJAZZ Collective at the Music Box Supper Club
by C. Andrew Hovan
Published: April 28, 2017
Read "Kneebody at Johnny Brenda's" Live Reviews Kneebody at Johnny Brenda's
by Mike Jacobs
Published: April 25, 2017
Read "Hyde Park Jazz Festival 2017" Live Reviews Hyde Park Jazz Festival 2017
by Mark Corroto
Published: October 1, 2017

Sponsor: ECM Records | BUY IT!  

Support our sponsor

Join the staff. Writers Wanted!

Develop a column, write album reviews, cover live shows, or conduct interviews.