Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

1

Charlotte Jazz Festival 2019

Perry Tannenbaum By

Sign in to view read count
With his customary cool, Marsalis mostly contented himself with narrating the proceedings from his seat in the back row with the other top brass. He stood up from that perch just once during his hosting chores, and interestingly enough, set off his signature trumpet pyrotechnics during "Old Man Blues," with [Wycliffe] Gordon engaging in battle and the whole trumpet section whipping out two-tone derby hats to wah-wah the out-chorus.
Patina Miller, The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, The Future of Jazz Orchestra, Maria Muldaur, Carlos Henriquez, Paul Nedzela, and Donna Hopkins
Charlotte Jazz Festival
Charlotte, NC
May 1-4, 2019

Presented by the Leon Levine Foundation and staged by Blumenthal Performing Arts, the Charlotte Jazz Festival is continuing to grow incrementally in its fourth season. Despite some egregious rookie mistakes—the opening two-day fest in 2016 fell on the first two nights of Passover!—this year's model ran like a Cadillac. Or perhaps it's better to say a Lincoln, since the influence of Wynton Marsalis and members of his Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra has permeated this young-and-growing celebration since the beginning.

Rising vocalist and JLCO saxophonist Camille Thurman headlined the 2019 festival's kickoff event at Romare Bearden Park with the Darrell Green Trio and a guest appearance by Marsalis. Hanging around for a second night, Marsalis and some other venerable vets meshed with The Future of Jazz Orchestra at Knight Theater in a lively Duke Ellington retrospective. Marsalis was gone on the following night at the Knight, but his melodies lingered on in a concert-length performance of Spaces by the JLCO and two featured dancers, Jared Grimes and Myles Yachts.

Then on the final night, while Tony Award winner Patina Miller was delivering an electrifying tribute to North Carolina icon Nina Simone, three aces from the JLCO sidled over to the Jazz Tent at Romare Bearden Park, each leading his own combo in a straight-ahead marathon that played on for nearly five hours. That immersion, collectively titled "The Gentlemen of Jazz," was preceded the previous evening by "Ladies Sing the Blues"—ladies first, right?—which had nothing to do with either Lady Day or JLCO but plenty to do with the blues.

Bracing for the evening-long immersions on the last two nights, we began with The Future and the Duke, a new show that was headed to the Big Apple the following night. From the outset, with three horns—including Wycliffe Gordon's slide—launching "Black and Tan Fantasy," and plunger mutes sprouting everywhere, the show was ready for primetime. Among the elders, it would be Dan Block who would get the most solo space, particularly when he put down his tenor sax and picked his clarinet, as he did early on in "Stompy Jones."

With his customary cool, Marsalis mostly contented himself with narrating the proceedings from his seat in the back row with the other top brass. He stood up from that perch just once during his hosting chores, and interestingly enough, set off his signature trumpet pyrotechnics during "Old Man Blues," with Gordon engaging in battle and the whole trumpet section whipping out two-tone derby hats to wah-wah the out-chorus. Anchoring the rhythm section, bassist Rodney Whitaker played the most notes among the blue bloods, but the he split his time behind the upright with Endea Owens, one of the most promising of the young bloods.

Appropriately referencing Duke's first bassist in his introductory remarks, Marsalis programmed showcases for both Owens and Whitaker in "Portrait of Wellman Braud" and "Dancers in Love." Covering the '20s through the '40s before intermission, the band mostly stuck with familiar titles like "The Mooche," "Caravan," "Cottontail," "Sophisticated Lady," "Rockin' in Rhythm," and—after an apt anecdote about young Billy Strayhorn—"Take the A Train." Great intro to the Duke for newbies in arrangements suffused with authenticity.

Dealing with the '50s through the '70s after intermission, The Future was more eclectic and adventurous. Here we had "Royal Ancestry" from Duke's tribute to Ella Fitzgerald, "Anitra's Dance" from his adaptation of Grieg's Peer Gynt Suite, and a couple of samplings from his film score work, including "Almost Cried" from Anatomy of a Murder. Rarest and most unexpected of all, the concert ended with a dip into The Afro-Eurasian Eclipse and, after the hip reference to Marshall McLuhan as the Duke's inspiration, "Chinoiserie." Young Julian Lee excelled here on tenor sax, his second triumph of the evening after evoking memories of Ben Webster in "Cottontail."

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Shop for Music

Start your music shopping from All About Jazz and you'll support us in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Live Reviews
Charlotte Jazz Festival 2019
By Mark Sullivan
May 16, 2019
Live Reviews
Nubya Garcia at Cathedral Quarter Arts Festival 2019
By Ian Patterson
May 16, 2019
Live Reviews
Electronic Explorations in Afro-Cuban and UK Jazz
By Chris May
May 15, 2019
Live Reviews
Charlotte Jazz Festival 2019
By Perry Tannenbaum
May 13, 2019
Live Reviews
Savannah Music Festival 2019
By Martin Longley
May 12, 2019
Live Reviews
Eyolf Dale at April Jazz
By Anthony Shaw
May 10, 2019
Live Reviews
Imogen Heap with guy Sigsworth at Lincoln Theatre
By Geno Thackara
May 10, 2019