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Diane Hubka: Look No Further

C. Michael Bailey By

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Diane Hubka: Look No Further
Skylark. Sweet-toned with considerable scat chops, Diane Hubka turns out and assertive collection of standards and vocalese on Look No Further. Ms. Hubka and friends swing with a gentle confidence, always maintaining a forward momentum. Ms. Hubka's voice requires no make-up. Her tone and approach are crystalline and precise. When she scats (as she does on the title track), it is without excess and grandiosity. She makes it look (sound) easy.

Hubka's band includes the fine pianist Frank Kimbrough, who along with guitarist John Hart, provide the harmonic propulsion. Interestingly, the only brass in this merry group is the trombone played by Scott Whitfield. This low brass adds to the mellow relaxed swing of this recording. He solos best on the vocalese 'In Walked John', a tome to the famous tenorist. Hubka does not have a weak moment on this recording. All pieces are sung with equal aplomb. If I had to give an edge to certain songs, Hubka excels on ballads such as 'Baltimore Oriole', but she also burns it up on faster pieces such as 'In Walked John.' Recommended without reservation..

Track Listing

Look No Further; Morning; Baltimore Oriole; Dolphin Dance; In Walked John; Photograph; Never Never Land; Small Day Tomorrow; Baby, You Should Know; In April; August Moon; Better Than Anything

Personnel

Diane Hubka-Vocals, Guitar; John Hart-Guitar; Frank Kimbrough-Piano; Dean Johnson - Bass; Tony Moreno - Drums; Scott Whitfield -Trombone

Album information

Title: Look No Further | Year Released: 2000 | Record Label: Naxos

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