380

The John Temmerman Quartet: Live in Evanston: John's Mixed Bag

C. Michael Bailey By

Sign in to view read count
The John Temmerman Quartet: Live in Evanston: John's Mixed Bag Let's hear it for the mainstream, grassroots jazz with a day job! Current Skokie, Illinois native John Temmerman was who Tip O'Neill might have been thinking of when he opined that "all politics [and everything else] is local." The saxophonist's live recording, Live in Evanston: John's Mixed Bag, is an affair local to his Skokie home. Balancing music with a day job and providing care to an ailing loved one keeps Temmerman close to home; if that doesn't make him the regular guy next door, nothing does.

Precious few artists are able to support themselves with music, much less jazz music. Even fewer are those who have a day job and are as exceptionally talented as Temmerman. The most attractive element in Temmerman's talent pool is his universality. His playing betrays the post-bop influences which can be heard in compositions such as "Plan B Downsized" and "Fundamental Dreamer." While Temmerman is respectful of John Coltrane, he is not controlled by that master. Instead, Temmerman claims Dexter Gordon as a major influence with definite elements of King Curtis, Junior Parker and the Texas Tenor tradition.

What does all that mean? Temmerman has a tremendous, catholic tone, one that easily competes with and occasionally overpowers his rhythm section. He bar walks with trumpeter Steve Thomas on Horace Silver's "Sister Sadie" and Eddie Harris' funky "Freedom Jazz Dance," making both performances juggernauts, insistently funky and propelled with groove. He also touches the nostalgia bone with a straight-ahead "Blue Moon," a potent "Norwegian Wood," and a splendidly languid "Stolen Moments."

Temmerman proves efficient and practical with his quartet rhythm section anchored with Neal Alger's fine guitar. More portable than the piano and more challenging as a rhythm section piece and solo voice, the guitar provides the perfect, delicate foil to Temmerman's enormous sound. Recordings like Live in Evanston are successful because of their simplicity and familiarity. These two characteristics make this recording very listenable and apt for repeat listens.

Track Listing: Plan B Downsized; Sister Sadie; Blue Moon; Spooky; An Aging Dream; Sooner of Later; Fundamental Dreamer; Norwegian Wood; Freedom Jazz Dance; Stolen Moments; Just a Closer Walk with Thee.

Personnel: John Temmerman: tenor and soprano saxophones; Neal Alger: guitar; Steven Hashimoto: bass; Rusty Jones, Steve Magnone: drums; Steve Thomas: trumpet.

Year Released: 2009 | Record Label: Self Produced | Style: Straight-ahead/Mainstream


Related Video

comments powered by Disqus

Shop

More Articles

Read The Big Wig CD/LP/Track Review The Big Wig
by Ian Patterson
Published: May 24, 2017
Read The Dreamer Is the Dream CD/LP/Track Review The Dreamer Is the Dream
by Mark Sullivan
Published: May 24, 2017
Read Bill Evans – Another Time: The Hilversum Concert CD/LP/Track Review Bill Evans – Another Time: The Hilversum Concert
by C. Michael Bailey
Published: May 24, 2017
Read The Failure of Words CD/LP/Track Review The Failure of Words
by Glenn Astarita
Published: May 24, 2017
Read Groove Dreams CD/LP/Track Review Groove Dreams
by Dan Bilawsky
Published: May 23, 2017
Read Kami Fusen CD/LP/Track Review Kami Fusen
by Glenn Astarita
Published: May 23, 2017
Read "Fierce Silence" CD/LP/Track Review Fierce Silence
by Mark Corroto
Published: August 4, 2016
Read "Triple Exposure" CD/LP/Track Review Triple Exposure
by Dan Bilawsky
Published: November 30, 2016
Read "Black Art Jazz Collective - Presented By The Side Door Jazz Club" CD/LP/Track Review Black Art Jazz Collective - Presented By The Side Door Jazz...
by Budd Kopman
Published: August 28, 2016
Read "Some Great Songs Vol. 2" CD/LP/Track Review Some Great Songs Vol. 2
by Mark Sullivan
Published: February 6, 2017
Read "Dare to Be" CD/LP/Track Review Dare to Be
by C. Andrew Hovan
Published: August 8, 2016
Read "Clean Spring" CD/LP/Track Review Clean Spring
by Budd Kopman
Published: June 21, 2016

Why wait?

Support All About Jazz and we'll deliver exclusive content, hide ads, hide slide-outs, and provide read access to our future articles.

Buy it!