Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

163

Art Farmer: Live at Stanford Jazz Workshop

Joel Roberts By

Sign in to view read count
As he approaches seventy, Art Farmer, the most lyrical and elegant of jazz horn players, shows no signs of slowing down. On this live recording, made last summer at Stanford University, Farmer fronts an all-star quintet featuring California tenor giant Harold Land, drummer Albert "Tootie" Heath, bassist Rufus Reid, and seldom heard pianist Bill Bell. Playing the "flumpet," a custom-made cross between a flugelhorn and a trumpet, Farmer leads the veteran group through a set of standards including three Monk tunes and one each by Kenny Dorham, Tadd Dameron, Mel Torme, and Land.

Farmer, who has been based in Vienna for many years, has always emphasized warmth, subtlety, and flawless technique over pyrotechnics and volume. He has earned a reputation as the most sensitive ballad player on his instrument this side of Miles, and he shines on Dameron's lovely "If You Could See Me Now." Land, who preceded Sonny Rollins in the fabled Max Roach-Clifford Brown group of the 1950s, steps out front on Torme's "Born to Be Blue" and his own composition "Rapture." His rich tenor complements Farmer's mellow flumpet beautifully throughout the album. The whole quintet gets to stretch out on Dorham's "Blue Bossa" and the group interplay on the finale, a rousing version of "Straight No Chaser," is as strong as you are likely to hear anywhere.

A noteworthy presence on this date is pianist Bill Bell. After working with Dizzy Gillespie, Cannonball Adderley, Benny Carter, and Carmen McRae in the 1960s, Bell moved to California and began a long career as a music educator. Here, he more than holds his own in a high-powered rhythm section with stalwarts Reid and Heath.

There are few surprises on this album, just altogether satisfying mainstream jazz played by some of the finest veteran musicians in the business.


Title: Live At Stanford Jazz Workshop | Year Released: 1997 | Record Label: Monarch Records

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Shop

Start your shopping here and you'll support All About Jazz in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Read Kresten Osgood Quintet Plays Jazz Album Reviews
Kresten Osgood Quintet Plays Jazz
By Dan McClenaghan
January 21, 2019
Read The Poetry of Jazz Volume Two Album Reviews
The Poetry of Jazz Volume Two
By Victor L. Schermer
January 21, 2019
Read Mesophase Album Reviews
Mesophase
By Glenn Astarita
January 21, 2019
Read Rasif Album Reviews
Rasif
By Chris M. Slawecki
January 21, 2019
Read Live at the Black Musicians' Conference, 1981 Album Reviews
Live at the Black Musicians' Conference, 1981
By John Sharpe
January 20, 2019
Read More Than One Thing Album Reviews
More Than One Thing
By Gareth Thompson
January 20, 2019
Read Wandering Monster Album Reviews
Wandering Monster
By Roger Farbey
January 20, 2019