Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

213

The Dixieland Ramblers: Live And Lighting It Up In New Orleans

Jim Santella By

Sign in to view read count
Five of the six traditional jazz artists heard here have paid their dues with The Dukes Of Dixieland. While it was a relaxed night out on the town for this group of veterans, recorded in action at the Old Point Bar across the river in Algiers, the session emphasizes superb virtuosity from each of the six artists. Clarinetist Michael Bennett and trumpeter Kevin Clark carry the load in time-honored roles. Both are on fire this night, and never seem to run out of ideas. Bennett shines on the up-tempo numbers, such as “Clarinet Marmelade” and “That’s-a-Plenty.”

Trombonist Harry Watters, a soldier and a member of the U.S. Army Blues Jazz Band in Washington, DC, adds one bright spot after another. His unique feature on “Muskrat Ramble” contributes an individual flavor to the session that reveals both humor and an improvisational charm. Pianist Tom McDermott rambles in the true spirit of trad jazz. His stretch on “Royal Garden Blues” reveals fresh ears for this older form of music.

The amplified bass gives The Dixieland Ramblers a contemporary sound: both fluid and upbeat. Walking for the most part, Jay Goetting also provides a few solo spots during which his bass recalls the fluid timbre of a tuba. With piano and drums, he leads the band’s driving rhythmic force.

While the live session introduces several rough spots – awkward transitions from one soloist to the next – the band’s spontaneity and technical mastery has created a recommended album that’s sure to delight most listeners.


Track Listing: Hindustan; Milneburg Joys; Chinatown, My Chinatown; I

Personnel: Michael Bennett- clarinet; Kevin Clark- trumpet; Harry Watters- trombone; Tom McDermott- piano; Jay Goetting- bass; Richard Taylor- drums.

Title: Live And Lighting It Up In New Orleans | Year Released: 2003 | Record Label: Unknown label

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Shop

Start your shopping here and you'll support All About Jazz in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Read Paint The Sky Album Reviews
Paint The Sky
By Andrew J. Sammut
February 21, 2019
Read God Is More Than Love Can Ever Be Album Reviews
God Is More Than Love Can Ever Be
By Karl Ackermann
February 21, 2019
Read Rhyme And Reason Album Reviews
Rhyme And Reason
By Mark Corroto
February 21, 2019
Read The Definition of Insanity Album Reviews
The Definition of Insanity
By Nicholas F. Mondello
February 21, 2019
Read Omhu Album Reviews
Omhu
By Jakob Baekgaard
February 21, 2019
Read In Between the Tumbling a Stillness Album Reviews
In Between the Tumbling a Stillness
By Karl Ackermann
February 20, 2019
Read Gary Album Reviews
Gary
By Dan McClenaghan
February 20, 2019