Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

126

Daniel Rosenthal: Lines

Greg Simmons By

Sign in to view read count
Lines, Daniel Rosenthal's debut as a leader, is a soft-spoken little album with an unusual instrumental mix and inventive tunes. The Boston trumpeter, a five-year veteran of the Either/Orchestra, offers stripped-down arrangements with the periodic inclusion of the banjo to spice things up.

With the exception of two Thelonious Monk tunes, Rosenthal is responsible for all of the music on Lines. The feel is loose and conversational, with improvisational duties largely swapped between Rosenthal and alto saxophonist Rick Stone. Banjoist Wes Corbett appears on four tracks, comping like a guitar, but with his instrument's plucky metallic sound adding a distinct sonic texture. Misapplied in jazz, the banjo risks sounding gimmicky, or worse, like an outtake from the soundtrack to Deliverance (1972). Rosenthal and Corbett avoid that fate completely, using the banjo like a piano or guitar in a rhythm section, with chorded comps and delicate fill lines. The sound of the instrument is a little disconcerting at first, but initial misgivings dissolve quickly when it becomes apparent that the banjo is musically integral.

Rosenthal's compositions are really solid. "Wedding Waltz" opens with a horn/banjo invocation, before drummer Austin McMahon enters at a slow trot. The melody, dispensed in a measured, relaxed voice that matches the tempo, is simple and pretty. Kendall Eddy's laconic bass reinforces the rhythm with simple plucked lines, and the banjo adds a touch of summer in the country.

Lines swings hardest on Monk's "Skippy," with the trumpet and alto doubling up the jagged melody before trading improvisations. The horns have the chops to nail this complex piece, but even on this solid bebopper, Rosenthal and Stone's consistent delivery integrates gracefully with the rest of the album.

Lines was recorded with minimal baffling between the instruments, allowing sound to bleed between the microphones within a natural soundstage. The overall effect is a little dark, with indistinct instrument imaging, but the music sounds very much as it might in a small club. This is a compliment when so many recordings try to spread instruments into unnatural sonic spotlights.

Rosenthal has a strong vision for his music, and his band supports that vision with deep symbiosis. The compositions are excellent, the band is stress-free, and the recording gives a genuine glimpse of the musical event. Lines is an excellent debut for a young trumpeter with a bright future.

Track Listing: Subo; Reflections; Lines; Interlude 1; Eraser; Skippy; Wedding Waltz; Interlude 2; Don't Call; Rabbit; TR; Standing.

Personnel: Daniel Rosenthal: trumpet, flugelhorn; Rick Stone: alto saxophone; Kendall Eddy: bass; Austin McMahon: drums.

Title: Lines | Year Released: 2011 | Record Label: American Melody

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Shop for Music

Start your music shopping from All About Jazz and you'll support us in the process. Learn how.

Subo

Subo

Daniel Rosenthal
Lines

Album Reviews
Read more articles
Music in the Room

Music in the Room

American Melody
2017

buy
Down the Road

Down the Road

American Melody
2016

buy
Fly Away

Fly Away

American Melody
2013

buy
Lines

Lines

American Melody
2011

buy

Related Articles

Read LE10 18-05 Album Reviews
LE10 18-05
By Karl Ackermann
May 20, 2019
Read Remembering Miles Album Reviews
Remembering Miles
By Dan McClenaghan
May 20, 2019
Read Merry Peers Album Reviews
Merry Peers
By Bruce Lindsay
May 20, 2019
Read Music! Music! Music! Album Reviews
Music! Music! Music!
By Doug Collette
May 20, 2019
Read Sheer Reckless Abandon Album Reviews
Sheer Reckless Abandon
By John Kelman
May 19, 2019
Read Gratitude: Stage Door Live @ the Z Album Reviews
Gratitude: Stage Door Live @ the Z
By Jack Bowers
May 19, 2019
Read To My Brothers Album Reviews
To My Brothers
By Victor L. Schermer
May 19, 2019