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Libertango - The art and music of Leonardo Suarez Paz

Duncan Heining By

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It would be much easier for me, if the vibes of the sixties were present now. Now, it’s all about image, about trademark. —Leonardo Suarez Paz
Argentinean violinist-composer Leonardo Suarez Paz personifies the tango. Both a dance and a music, Tango bridles with passion and seethes with a barely suppressed sexual tension. "To bridle" is the correct verb here with its dual connotations of intense emotion and constraint. It is far from the braggadocio of immature machismo and speaks instead to a mature sexuality. Few other musics, if any, move so comfortably on the dance floor or stand so proudly on the concert stage.

Leonardo Suarez Paz is tango royalty. His father Fernando played violin with Astor Piazzolla, the great tango composer and bandoneon player. His mother Beatriz is a famous singer within the music and, throughout Suarez Paz' childhood, the family home thronged with musicians, poets, dancers and artists. Now, he carries that mantle forward in his own music.

We talk via Skype, he in his apartment in that cultural melting pot of New York, whilst I sit in my study in that cultural wasteland of South Essex, where tango—if it means anything at all—means Strictly Come Dancing or a fizzy drink rich in artificial additives. "I want to show you something," Suarez Paz says and turns away from the screen. He produces the jaw of a shark and holds it close to the motion eye. There is writing in Spanish on the inside of the jaw. "I'll translate for you," he tells me, grinning at the memory. "Astor was a keen fisher of sharks and he gave me this when I was a boy. He always took a big interest in my violin studies and this says, 'Leonardo, if you do not study, the shark will eat you."

It must have been an incredible childhood. Yet having growing up in that milieu sometimes leaves Suarez Paz frustrated with the monoculture that is the music business today. "It is very strong in me and at times makes things more difficult," he says and pauses to find the right words, "because you understand about the freedom of creation and the world isn't about the freedom of creation now."

And he continues, "It changed. It is not the sixties anymore. They want to pigeonhole you. I play jazz. I play tango. I write and I arrange. I play classical, too. That should help but it does not. I dance and I sing. People don't understand that because you are only supposed to do one thing. I am not like that."

The contrast with the world of Suarez Paz' childhood and adolescence could not be greater, as he recalls, "I grew up in world where they were creating all the time. In my house, it was a centre—a hang out for composers and musicians. They were making barbecues and playing till six or seven in the morning. As children, we did not have any restriction. We could be sleeping there next to them. It was a beautiful experience and it was all about creation. People were creating lyrics, improvising lyrics as in rap right now. There were all these big poets like Ferrer (Horracio Ferrer). I grew up in all of that. I have to continue working through that line, which is very tough. It would be much easier for me, if the vibes of the sixties were present now. Now, it's all about image, about trademark." He almost spits out that last sentence.

My own introduction to tango came with a series of CDs made by Latvian violinist Gidon Kremer for Nonesuch in the late nineties. I mention this but Suarez Paz' response is instructive. "I respect him as a violinist a lot. He has a great technique and great expression and actually because he is an internationally famous musician, he played a very good part for the tango, because he played the music of Piazzolla. But if you want to go to the real sound you have to hear Piazzolla's own quintet. That's the only way to understand his music because Gidon Kremer...it is really clear that he listened to my father a lot but also it is really clear that it is not in his nature, that music. That's the situation with the tango. If you don't have it in your nature, it's a really big leap to really get this music."

For Suarez Paz, attempts by groups like Gotan Project and Tanghetto to bring tango to younger audiences achieve little of lasting benefit. It is rather like promoters and critics who pretend that cross-over artists bring young people to jazz. Few, very few, will make that journey, preferring just a taster or two on their MP3 player before deleting them for some new flavour or other.

But it is not that Suarez Paz lacks openness. He just hates the artificial and transitory nature of a business built on trading music like a commodity. He studied jazz in Argentina and, after all, as he points out Piazzolla himself moved to New York at one time living with fellow Argentineans saxophonist Gato Barbieri and pianist Lalo Schifrin in a studio apartment. Back then the great man harboured ambitions of becoming a jazz musician—there just weren't that many openings for a bandoneon player! In that respect, Leonardo Suarez Paz has surpassed his mentor.

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