Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

993

Larry Goldings: Versatility of Keyboards... And Music

R.J. DeLuke By

Sign in to view read count
Eventually Maceo Parker heard me and hired me in his band, and that's when I really started getting experience on the Hammond organ. I literally learned on the gig.
Pianist/organist Larry Goldings is a player whose name has turned up more and more over the years on projects with some of the top names in the music business. His own projects, largely his organ trio, have always been artistic successes.

He continues to stretch, exploring opportunities to grow and explore his varied music interests. He's still being called by top-flight musicians to join a tour, or a recording session, and at the same time Goldings keeps his fine trio working. His reputation is the result of a long road of studying, working jam sessions, and getting involved with great professionals at a relatively young age.

He has developed as one of the more skilled players, but isn't just a technician. He approaches music with an open mind and an affinity to look at things in different ways, with equal parts freedom and tradition, as can be witnessed in his latest CD, Quartet, a departure from the organ trio setting. The 11th record under his own name, it's a sharp disc on which some outstanding and varied musical minds develop a synergy that carries the day. There are different feels through the 12 offerings, and all of them carried out in fine fashion.

The recording starts out with Goldings on piano, ("Singsong") laying out a simple melody that the band carries in a loose, yet structured fashion. The trumpet of New York City veteran trumpeter John Sneider is melodic and uncluttered. Matt Wilson's drums create the right underpinning and Ben Allison's bass is weaves in; unhurried and strong. "Au Bord De L'Eau is an interesting, moving jazz line giving Goldings room to express his fondness for melody and harmony. It swings. And the CD goes on from there, with splashes from Goldings' pen, and plenty of contributions from the others. They take on Monk and Bjork in the process. And the old "Hesitation Blues, with the delightful Madeleine Peyroux —herself a breath of fresh air on the current music scene—is deliciously cool. Sneider's trumpet fills are on the mark and Geldings' organ is expressive. It holds interest throughout.

Goldings is pleased with the CD, and glad to be taking music in a directions away from his organ trio—with Peter Bernstein on guitar and Bill Stewart on drums—which itself has provided some fine music for over a decade, particularly The Intimacy of the Blues (Verve, 1991) and Sweet Science (Palmetto, 2002).

He's known for his work on the Hammond B3, an instrument that was rejuvenated a decade or so ago and is being put to good use by several players nowadays. It has perhaps surpassed his notoriety as a fine pianist (though that may be changing, as his opportunities on the acoustic instrument grow). But the Boston-area native fell into it the instrument slowly, even unintentionally, after leaving music school in the late 1980s.

"Around 1988 or 89, I started playing a portable version. I never really had experience at that time with a real Hammond B3. But I was interested in organ-type of keyboards. I started the group with Pete and Bill probably around '89 or '90.

"As a kid when I was first getting into jazz, I tended to play baselines on the piano. Somehow I gravitated toward that. Probably because I had a love for a pianist by the name of David McKenna from the New England area, says Goldings. "His approach was always with a walking baseline. That's how I approached it. I think there was a connection between that and actually wanting to walk baseline on the organ. I was pretty good at it. It had pretty good independence in that way. I like the control factor or something.

He says among the records he enjoyed growing up were Billy Preston and Aretha Franklin R&B, and Wes Montgomery with organ legend Jimmy Smith. He continued to play the instrument, and "eventually Maceo Parker (a stalwart of soul legend James Brown's horn section) heard me and hired me in his band, and that's when I really started getting experience on the Hammond organ. I literally learned on the gig. Then through Maceo's producer, I made my first record (Intimacy of the Blues). Ironically, at least to me at the time, it was an organ record, even though I barely knew it. That kind of got me on the map as an organ player. It was totally not my intention, but that's sort of how it happened.

His organ trio became very well established in the 1990s, and is one Goldings is not going to drop any time soon. "It was, and still is, the truest group of mine; the most comfortable group situation I've ever been in, he says.

Goldings grew up listening to pop music of the 1970s, but seemed to always have a fondness and feel for interesting harmonies. That is still quite evident today.

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Album Reviews
Radio
What is Jazz?
Album Reviews
Multiple Reviews
Album Reviews
Interviews
Album Reviews
Read more articles
Toy Tunes

Toy Tunes

Pirouet Records
2018

buy
Ramshackle Serenade

Ramshackle Serenade

Pirouet Records
2014

buy
When Larry Met Harry

When Larry Met Harry

Cafe Society
2011

buy
In My Room

In My Room

BFM Jazz
2011

buy
Quartet

Quartet

Palmetto Records
2006

buy
Sweet Science

Sweet Science

Palmetto Records
2002

buy

Upcoming Shows

Shop

Start your shopping here and you'll support All About Jazz in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Interviews
Matt Davis: Big Family, Big Picture
By Dan Bilawsky
March 21, 2019
Interviews
Casey Benjamin: EclectRic Expressionism
By Barbara Ina Frenz
March 6, 2019
Interviews
Cooper-Moore: Catharsis and Creation in Community Spirit
By Jakob Baekgaard
February 26, 2019
Interviews
Susanna Risberg: Bold As Love
By Ian Patterson
February 25, 2019
Interviews
David Crosby: A Revitalized Creativity
By Mike Jacobs
January 22, 2019
Interviews
Chuck Deardorf: Hanging On To The Groove
By Paul Rauch
January 19, 2019