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Josh Roseman: Reimagining the Constellations

R.J. DeLuke By

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There's nothing in my life that's more grounding or more challenging than trying to play trombone. It demands a lot from me personally. It's a constant gut check. It forces you to be in touch with your priorities. And to check out your conduct.
Josh Roseman is a busy man. Extremely busy. He's also an extremely bright one, which is good because otherwise one might pause to consider whether, with all those activities, he is wearing himself too thin. Turns out he is spreading wide, but nothing about him or his many pursuits is thin. Especially not his creativity.

Trombonist/composer/arranger/cosmic thinker Roseman also has a production studio and venue space in Brooklyn. He heads five bands that play different kinds of music, two of which will have new recordings out over the next several months. Then there are sideman gigs with various colleagues.

"A pathological condition. Or the reflection of a pathological condition," quips Roseman, a blithe spirit, about all the irons he has in the fire. "I'm not sure which."

Roseman, raised in the Boston area but a New York city resident since 1990, is a forward thinker, for sure. Conversation reveals with all his talent and drive, he doesn't take himself too seriously. That does not mean—at all—that he is unconcerned. And with all his stretching of boundaries and willingness to rely on intuition and let things fly freely in his music, he does not ignore traditions on which jazz music is based. He has the utmost respect for the paths that have been beaten by the feet of those who came before him.

But Roseman is, surely, a musician for his era, where he is making a strong mark. A snippet of some of the observations penned about him by critics include: "powerful and eccentric ... intelligent groove music ... musical provocateur ... blur between childlike innocence and libertine dementia." They are all accurate. His music contains many influences, like ska and dub, as much as it carries the spirit of the beboppers. He also likes electronics and the musical alchemist finds ways to make them all at once interesting, upsetting, unpredictable, contrary and yet viable in his musical mixture. Listen to albums like New Constellations: Live in Vienna (Scrootable Labs/Accurate, 2007) and Treats for the Nightwalker (Enja, 2003) and all these funky influences can be heard. Yet he also wails straight ahead with the Dave Holland Big Band and, at one time, the SFJAZZ Collective.

"I like the free approach. I like things to be strong, even if they're quiet. Even if it's just a question of leaving a lot of space, I would like the space to be effective and to present a set of options for the listener somehow," says Roseman. "None of this is based on chaos for its own sake. I just tend to find that I like situations that have a lot of contour and detail and that have a lot of intent to them. I either have to write them or set up conditions where they might come around. The purpose of doing that is not just to have something that sounds different from what you hear on the radio, or that sounds unruly. I'm after something that has a meta kind of content to it, where people feel free to show how different dynamics, different colors, different approaches, different forms of expression, are interrelated. I like this because it's my instinct to look for ways to integrate experiences and my influences, and my attention span really starts to wane if we're just focusing on one element at a time."

Like great artists, Roseman doesn't just draw on musical things for his music. "We live in New York City. People have to deal with each other. Situations are happening all the time. You're in a beautiful neighborhood, but maybe it's not safe. You're in a crazy neighborhood, but people are incredibly real with you. Or you're on a train going from one neighborhood to another really quickly. Or you're listening to new music, but it's music samples from a long time ago. Or you're listening to popular music, but there's a level of dissonance going on in the back, but it's somehow still compelling. Try to deconstruct that, figuring out how these things can be happening simultaneously. How it challenges our expectations. That's how I get very interested somehow. That's what I'm looking for in a musical situation."

The New Constellations album, recorded at Joe Zawinul's Birdland, and then touched up with some remixing in the studio, is a good example of Roseman's musical nature. With equally experimental cohorts like Peter Apfelbaum and Barney McAll, the music is at times, dense, free, melodic and scattered. But it hangs together. "Salta Massaganna" springs from reggae and is an irresistible vehicle over which Roseman's great trombone sound dances. His notes pour like syrup over delicious pancakes. It evokes a feeling. "Olsen Twins Subpoena" has a lot of subtext, from funk to cosmic. The horns of Roseman, Apfelbaum and Ambrose Akinmusire blare out jazz improv, but across a different canvass.

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