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John MacLeod & His Rex Hotel Orchestra / Tim Davies Big Band / New England Jazz Ensemble

Jack Bowers By

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John MacLeod & His Rex Hotel Orchestra

Our First Set

Self Published

2010

Those who mourn the passing of the great trombonists Rob McConnell and Dave McMurdo and, with them, two of the most renowned big bands Canada has ever produced, should take substantial comfort from this superlative debut recording by John MacLeod and His Rex Hotel Orchestra, an ensemble patterned after the Boss Brass in whose trumpet section MacLeod was a standout for some fifteen years. To further amplify the likeness, MacLeod's orchestra houses no less than nine former members of the Boss Brass and four alumni of the McMurdo orchestra. Like McConnell, MacLeod uses two French horns, one of whom, James MacDonald, performed the same duties for the Boss Brass. And like McConnell, MacLeod's charts (he arranged everything save "I'm in the Mood for Love") are unerring models of big-band tastefulness and swing.

MacLeod wrote the lively opener, "Great Danes," and three other charmers —"B.S. Blues," "Marta's Vineyard," "Song for Rachel." Gord Sheard, a fellow faculty member at Humber College, composed the Caribbean-inspired "Monkey on the Roof," tenor saxophonist (and McMurdo alum) Mike Murley the slow blues "Sometimes You Feel Like That," on which he doubles as phenomenal guest soloist. Returning for a moment to "I'm in the Mood for Love," it was handsomely arranged by McConnell's right-hand man, Rick Wilkins (who was unable to play on the album, as planned, and was replaced by Bob DeAngelis). MacLeod snapped the afterburners on Rodgers and Hart's usually even-tempered "Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered" and redesigned David Raksin's lovely standard, "Laura," to showcase the impressive talents of lead trombonist Alastair McKay. ("Only trombonists," MacLeod writes, "will know how impossible this kind of playing is.")

Besides MacLeod, MacDonald, Wilkins and McKay, the Boss Brass alumni are lead alto John Johnson, baritone Bob Leonard, trumpeters Steve McDade and Dave Dunlop, bassist Jim Vivian and drummer Ted Warren, while McMurdo's grads are Murley, trombonists Rob Somerville and Terry Promane, lead trumpeter Jason Logue and tenor saxophonist Perry White (who played baritone in McMurdo's orchestra). Among the newcomers, alto Andy Ballantyne is sharp and resourceful on "The Great Danes" and "Marta's Vineyard," guitarist Joey Goldstein sleek and mellow on "Vineyard" and "B.S. Blues." Vivian and Promane also solo on "Blues," while White and pianist David Braid shine on "I'm in the Mood for Love." "Bewitched" is a fast-paced scrimmage for trumpeters McDade and Jon Challoner, "Monkey" a snappy vehicle for Braid and Johnson (on alto and soprano sax). MacLeod solos on flugel ("Great Danes") and muted cornet ("Song for Rachel," "Sometimes You Feel Like That"). With Warren and Vivian showing the way for Braid and Goldstein, the rhythm section is in steady and capable hands.

MacLeod's orchestra has had a steady weekly gig for a number of years at Toronto's Rex Hotel, hence its rather unusual name, which sounds somewhat like a remnant from the golden age of big band radio broadcasts. Whatever the rationale, this band by any other name would be as flat-out awesome, and that's all anyone needs to know. The Boss Brass and Dave McMurdo Jazz Orchestra are gone forever, but their influence and artistry live on, thanks to John MacLeod and his superlative ensemble. Let's hope this First Set is the harbinger of many yet to come.

Tim Davies Big Band

Dialmentia

Origin

2010

It was Martin Luther King Jr. who said, "I have a dream." And it was drummer / bandleader Tim Davies who responded, "I'll see your dream and raise you several nightmares." Indeed, it is Davies' troubled dreams, fears and phobias that serve as the impetus for Dialmentia, recorded in 2007 with the transplanted Aussie's Los Angeles-based big band. The first four numbers comprise Davies' Dream Trilogy, each of whose movements is based on a recurring dream or a theme from a dream. (How a trilogy consists of four movements is anyone's guess.)

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