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John Coltrane Birthday Celebration: Harnessing The Coltrane Effect

Paul Rauch By

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Richard Cole Group
Tula's Jazz Club
Seattle WA
September 23, 2016

The calendar read September 23, 2016, the 90th anniversary of the birth of John Coltrane, and as in many cities in America, and around the world, the music of this master innovator is being celebrated in performance, by modern jazz musicians who have been musically inspired by his courage, by his absence of compromise, by his relentless impatience, by his quest for an undefined destination that continues to shine a beacon of hope and peace. This was certainly the case for me, as I entered Seattle's iconic Tula's jazz club for the annual rite of passage in Seattle. I was intrigued by the selection of musicians this year, for their undeniable virtuosity, and for their musical parallels to the great master for whom they gathered that warm, early autumn evening.

This year's quartet was led by saxophonist Richard Cole, who cites the seminal performances of Coltrane and Joe Henderson as major influences, as is starkly evident in his approach on both the tenor and soprano saxophone. His angular solos have always reminded me of Coltrane, along with Eric Dolphy, and so his participation and selection of musicians to join him for the occasion made perfect sense, as would become evident from the first selection of the evening, the Coltrane standard, "Lazybird," from the classic Blue Train album. The quartet was rounded out by three of the best players on the west coast, and certainly most suitable in terms of technique and musical IQ. Pianist Bill Anschell, who has carved a diverse and sizeable path as a leader, both onstage, and in the studio, was the perfect foil on this evening, strongly reminiscent of the playing of McCoy Tyner in this quartet setting, his powerful left hand laying down the harmonic structure for his detached, staccato style runs with his right hand, almost maximalist in nature. Veteran bassist Phil Sparks, whose rich tone, steady time, and inventive counter lines were essential ingredients to the sound of this quartet the entire evening. Drummer Matt Jorgensen whose performances have often been compared to the great Elvin Jones, per his sense of timing, polyrhythmic tendencies, dynamic phrasing, and free flowing style, completed this well suited quartet.

This year, the importance, the need, to celebrate this music seemed more relevant, more applicable to our current lives. Coltrane's music has always inspired the spiritual aspirations of the listener, of walking closer to the mysteries of the universe, of finding peace, if not for only that brief moment, in our journey in life through music moving forward. We live in a time when our collective soul as a nation is damaged from the violence perpetrated by both religious fanaticism, and by those whose task it is to protect us, the police, against African American men on the streets of this alleged beacon of freedom and justice in the world. Terence Crutcher, and Keith Lamont Scott were occupying a place in my heart as I entered the club that evening, I imagined the anguish and torment being experienced by their loved ones, and by all of us who envision a world of peace, united in brotherhood, and on the occasion of Coltrane's birthday, augmented by the light of peace envisioned by John Coltrane, so purposely expressed through his music.

We learned a half hour before the beginning of the performance that five people, including four women, had been gunned down in a mall ninety minutes north of Seattle, life so callously disregarded, violence so randomly perpetrated, my heart was heavy, my soul was bleeding, in need of healing, of prayer, of the rhythmic incantation that only music can provide. I introduced the band, expressing briefly, that I hope we can all find some peace in the music that evening.

The band continued with "Equinox," then "Some Other Blues," and Mal Waldron's "Soul Eyes," all from the Impulse years from 1961-1965, Cole's brooding, angular, voice like phrasing striking a resemblance to the master, yet uniquely expressive in a very personal way. He was acknowledging, but not quoting or paraphrasing, filling the evening with his rich, modal style that has become his signature. His superb soprano solo on "Soul Eyes," seemed to ignite the evening to a different level, and a stellar bass solo from Sparks upholds the standard.

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