Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

405

Jessica Jones Live at Bowery Poetry Club, NYC

By

Sign in to view read count
Her voice reached towards the sky and clawed at the gutter simultaneously
Jessica Jones Quartet Featuring Candace Jones
Bowery Poetry Club
New York, New York
July 13, 2008

The first notes of Candace Jones' voice hit me like a tornado. Sure, they were sung softly, but that did not lessen their impact. I smiled to myself. So much beauty in the world.
Saxophonist-composer-bandleader Jessica Jones and her band/family (more on that later) invaded the Bowery Poetry Club on July 13 under the guise of a show celebrating the release of Jessica's newest record, Word, an album rife with experimentation in the combining of poetry and jazz (po' jazz). What resulted was a showcase for daughter Candace and the power, grace, beauty, and humor of her voice. The entire midsection of the show was devoted to the younger Jones, belting many of her mother's compositions as well as a few standards. > The band included three Joneses (Jessica and husband Tony on twin tenor saxophones along with Candace) backed by a rhythm section of Ken Filiano (bass) and James Windsor-Wells (drums). Mark Taylor joined the group sparingly on various wind instruments. The abovementioned first song was Rodgers & Hart's "My Romance," which started out innocently enough. But after those first few notes, sung by Candace sans accompaniment, her voice reached towards the sky and clawed at the gutter simultaneously. As the notes got higher, her voice, it seemed, became more powerful.
Subsequent songs seemed to encompass Candace's entire teen life. Each tune was prefaced by: "Jessie wrote this one for me when I was 13"; or "Jessie wrote this one for me when I was 19 and had just had a bad breakup," etc. Maybe that's why the vocalist was able to sing them with such gusto. But regardless of the source of her inspiration, she ran the gamut from sultry and seductive to emotional and powerful, from wryly humorous to deeply disturbing. Moreover, she wore her emotions on her face, giving every note a purpose.

Jessica's compositions provided perfect vehicles for Candace's chops. Many of them snakelike in their twists and turns, the five songs had the musical-emotional weight of ten. Jessica, though a saxophonist by trade, eschewed the horn in favor of keyboards for most of Candace's songs, choosing to stay in the background while giving her daughter the spotlight. And Candace made the most of the opportunity, easily stepping into the role of star of the show.

After Candace's performance, the stage was left without a vocalist during an instrumental interlude as the audience caught its collective breath. Soon, however, the band was joined by poet Abe Maneri, whose spoken word provided a reassuring counterpoint to the band's pointillist ruminations. He and the band were obviously in synch, as his voice rose and fell in sympathy with the ebb and flow of the underlying music.

But the prize of the night was most certainly Candace. While the accompaniment was often amateurish and disjointed, the vocalist was able to command attention so completely that the audience noticed only her compelling vocals. She is admittedly comparatively "raw," given her enormous potential, but if she can sing so effectively on the basis of inherent talent, one can only anticipate the masterful performances that experience and training are certain to bring.

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Album Reviews
Interviews
Album Reviews
  • Word by Michael P. Gladstone
Live Reviews
Megaphone
Album Reviews
  • Word by Mark Corroto
Extended Analysis
Album Reviews
  • Nod by Dan McClenaghan
  • Nod by John Kelman
Read more articles
Continuum

Continuum

Reva Records
2019

buy
Moxie

Moxie

New Artists Records
2015

buy
Word

Word

New Artists Records
2008

buy
Nod

Nod

New Artists Records
2004

buy

Upcoming Shows

Date Detail Price
Jan25Fri
Jessica Jones Quartet
The Jazz Gallery
New York, NY
Feb8Fri
Jessica Jones Quartet and the Pitch, Rhythm and...
ShapeShifter Lab
Brooklyn, NY

Shop

Start your shopping here and you'll support All About Jazz in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Live Reviews
Kevin Bales With Chuck Redd At The Jazz Corner
By Martin McFie
January 21, 2019
Live Reviews
Darrell Grant Black Art @ 25 Quartet at Birdland Theater
By Mike Jurkovic
January 18, 2019
Live Reviews
Odean Pope Quartet at the Philadelphia Museum of Art
By Victor L. Schermer
January 15, 2019
Live Reviews
Denise Donatelli at Mezzrow
By Nicholas F. Mondello
January 10, 2019
Live Reviews
The Los Cabos Jazz Experience 2018
By Wendy Ross
January 5, 2019