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Jeff Berlin: Still the Ace of Bass

John Patten By

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Through the course of a four-decade career, Jeff Berlin has refused to end his musical quest. He crafted a popping, percussive style so thoroughly ingrained in the recordings of the 1980s, it's nearly ubiquitous. His work with Bill Bruford, whom he met during a stint with Yes, led to further innovations in playing.

More recently, he's been developing a contrapuntal style of playing that allows him to approach bass guitar as a pianist, adding harmony and melody to his steady bottom line. Berlin also opened the Players School of Music, in Clearwater, Florida, in 1988, focused on teaching contemporary and jazz music using his ideas on learning music and performance. His experience as not only one of the most in-demand sidemen, but also as a founder of the Los Angeles-based Bass Institute of Technology, helped him develop an approach that he says keeps students focused on making music. He's so confident in the program, he issued a guarantee for students attending a week-long intensive session, scheduled for September 13-17, 2010.

All About Jazz: You've kind of thrown down the gauntlet for the Intensive Music Program, according to a press release ("I've said so many negative things about so much of music education, that my reputation is riding upon the very improvement that I promise to players who attend this event. One hundred percent who attend must get better as players or I will have to answer for it! For this reason, I made sure that everybody on every instrument, on every musical level goes home better than when they first arrived!"). What made you issue such an ultimatum? Have you changed something in the curriculum or approach that's used?

Jeff Berlin: I threw down the gauntlet because I can't lose the bet. One hundred percent of anybody who comes to my school—reader, non-reader, player, non- player—will improve if they do the work that is assigned to them. The first thing that they learn is that it is okay to make mistakes. This is their right as students to do and this is one reason why they improve so fast with me; they learn to not be worried about making mistakes.

Another thing is that I don't emphasize performance in time to the students—I'm not talking about ensembles in music school where students play on tunes to learn how to play better. I'm referring to the insistence of putting groove, time or practicing with metronomes as important academic study concepts. They aren't, because things related to time and feel are automatically grandfathered into the learning, practicing and playing experience. In other words, you will groove as your musical experience grows, so first learn what to do before you try to perform.

Remember the Charlie Parker story where the drummer threw his cymbal on the floor to interrupt the young inexperienced Parker's bad playing? If the story is true or not, it isn't a stretch to assume that at that time in his musical life, Parker didn't know enough about music to perform it with those top players. So he disappeared into the practice room, while continuing playing on regional gigs, until he emerged to become the player that he became. This is how it was for every good player! Music solves all things and for this and other reasons, I can't lose the bet. I don't expect the students to play well. I expect them to practice well—ot long hours, not hard music—but well! Everybody who comes to the One Week Intensive will go home a better player because they aren't expected to perform, but to learn. Their performance will happen to them as an automatic payback for learning properly. It always does!

AAJ: What are some of the goals you have for the Players School? What have you learned from your students? What have you learned from operating the school?

JB: What I learned from my students is that they vindicate me in all that I have said about music education that some people consider controversial. If my students did not improve as players through the methods that I have prescribed, then I would have to be blind not to see this and change directions in how I taught. But this never happened—more's the contrary! Guys who couldn't read a single note were noticeably improved in a few weeks, without exception. People improved at my school because music is the center of everything they practice, and lucky for them that it is. Their improvement told me that music itself was the Grand Poobah of all educational methods. There simply is nothing in music education to compare with real, perfect, undeniably-without-flaw musical fact. If you learn one note, then you can learn another. And another! Remember that all that it took to open up the entire world to a blind and deaf Helen Keller was one single word, water, spelled into her hand by her teacher. One word, and her life was changed. Some musicians are still blind and deaf because they aren't learning the musical equivalent of "water!" I won't let this happen at my school!

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