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Jean-Luc Ponty: Strong As Ever

R.J. DeLuke By

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I have evolved. I have the addition of years of experience, but basically I
Jean-Luc PontyAs a violinist in the changing music world of the 1960s and 1970s, Jean-Luc Ponty was it. He was a pioneer on the instrument, plugging in to be heard with screeching guitars and blaring horns. He not only had the chops-busting harmonic and rhythmic language of bebop down pat, but he had virtuoso abilities from his classical training. He combined them during a time of upheaval, in music and in society, in groups like Frank Zappa's Mothers of Invention and John McLaughlin's hair-raising Mahavishnu Orchestra. And he transferred it to his own bands and music.

Ponty has remained at it ever since, even as others on his instrument come onto the scene, some of them gaining significant stature among critics and listeners. Ponty remains one of its virtuoso players and an important stylistic springboard from violinists of the swing era to the age of post-bop, rock and even psychedelia.

The group he's been playing with for the last few years has provided different rhythms and voicings through which Ponty weaves his dynamic playing. Soon to be 65 (Sept. 29, 2007), Ponty is still open to new ideas and his passion for the music is obvious. It's noticeable on stage, and clearly evident on The Acatama Experience (Koch, 2007), with his working band augmented in spots by guitarists Alan Holdsworth and Philip Catherine.

Caught in June, 2007 at the Freihofer Jazz Festival in Upstate New York, Ponty's band was vibrant. The layers of rhythms from William Lecomte on keyboards, Guy Nsangué Akwa on electric bass, Thierry Arpino on drums and Taffa Cissé on percussion served as a strong canvass on which Ponty could paint. The music was alive, much to the pleasure of Ponty himself.

"I was happily surprised that the new material sounds so good quickly, he said a week later. "It was tight very fast. The fact that this is performed by a band so used to playing together, it really helps to foster the performance.

But in the creation of the material for the album, the band was unable to work on the pieces, Ponty was so busy with other things. Plus, he didn't want any of the music to get out prematurely because of his record deal.

"What we did in the studio was totally fresh, which is also pretty good, says Ponty. "After playing them on the road, it's true, they change a little bit. It's not necessarily better, for the improvisations, at least. There's something to be said about the fresh improvisation, the very first stream that you get from the very new impression from the new music piece. If it inspires you, it can be special and something that never comes back once you know the piece better. I like that freshness. Later on, I can do a live album and then you have a dated interpretation with new improvisations.

He says when he signed the record deal with Koch, he didn't realize an album would be due so soon. The band was booked all over the world. "Sometimes it would be a whole tour, like in the U.S. Sometimes it would be two or three dates a month, but very far away, taking us on long trips to Chile or India. At first I was a little concerned it would delay a lot of my work on the album. On the other hand, each time I came back to the project, my ears were totally fresh. Somehow, the freshness I got from these travels influenced the development of the music.

Jean-LucThere was also new music written throughout 2006 for the new recording. Says Ponty, "The main concept was performances with the band, which has been together for quite awhile. Then I have also two solos, which are going in extremely different directions. One is totally electronic, the other one being completely acoustic. The goal was to play as live as possible in the studio, the way I was recording in the beginning of my career before all the technology came; building a lot of albums bit by bit, different layers of improvisation on different days. This was more the band playing in the studio.

"I started collecting new material whenever ideas would come to my mind. I don't wait until the last minute, until I have to deliver an album, to start writing. Whenever inspiration comes my way, if I am at home in my studio, I will record immediately the ideas, to be developed later. If I am on the road, maybe sheet music. When it comes time to do an album, I start developing good ideas. I also ask the guys in the band—my pianist [Lecomte] contributed one piece and he made the arrangement on the be-bop piece by Bud Powell ["Parisian Thoroughfare ], which he rearranged with modern rhythms.

The resulting CD is a fine mix of electric and acoustic, strung together by tight modern rhythms, some influenced by the African roots of Cissé and Nsangué. Ponty plays gently, even sparingly at times. The music breathes. Other times he veers off to make bolder and brighter statements. His sound and chops are very together as he negotiates the different tempos and adds his signature touch. It's expressive, and even funky at times.


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