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Hong Kong International Jazz Festival, Days 4-6, September 28-30, 2011

Hong Kong International Jazz Festival, Days 4-6, September 28-30, 2011
Ian Patterson By

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Days 1-3 | Days 4-6 | Days 7-8
Hong Kong International Jazz Festival
Hong Kong
September 25-October 2, 2011

The 2011 Hong Kong International Jazz Festival offered up over forty groups from 24 countries—a big jump from the eight bands that made up the first edition of HKIJF in 2008. Apart from the music, there was a series of activities and talks covering a wide range of topics. Workshops focused on improvisation, creativity for children, vocal improvisation and interaction through rhythm. The "Dialogues with Jazz" talks addressed various issues concerning jazz in South East Asia, as well as historical overviews of jazz in the United States and Central Europe. One of the most interesting non-musical offerings was the photographic exhibition entitled "Jam Session: America's Jazz Ambassadors Embrace the World," though oddly, it finished before a single note of the 2011 Hong Kong International Jazz Festival had sounded.

Featuring 55 photographs, the exhibition portrayed many of jazz's historic figures on State Department-sponsored world tours from the 1950s to the 1970s, and ran from September 13-23 before relocating to Macau, thereby missing the HKIJF by a couple of days. Odd timing perhaps, but the reason for the exhibition's premature departure was simple enough, as Naeema Whatley, Cultural Unit Chief for the U.S. Consulate General in Hong Kong explained: "There's no space available. The photos need specially acclimatized environments and to find a suitable space in Hong Kong you need to book a year, a year-and -a-half in advance."

Hong Kong at Night

Space is definitely at a premium in Hong Kong, one of the most densely populated cities in the world. The thinness of many of the buildings—which seem like they've been sliced in half lengthwise—is often surprising. People's apartments, street eateries, shops and many hotel rooms are barely two or three meters wide. Perhaps it would have been more logical to start the exhibition in Macau and shift it down to Hong Kong to coincide with the HKIJF. Then again, maybe there's no space in Macau either, due to all the casinos cluttering the place up.

The single concert on the fourth day was Blanca's Songs, a French jazz quartet fronted by Blanca Gallice and augmented by a four-piece string section of local musicians. The concert was relocated from the intimate setting of Vibes, to the ballroom of the Mira hotel, due to fear of the arrival of Typhoon Nesat, which after leaving 39 dead in the Philippines, was gathering pace and heading towards the city. As it turned out, the move was probably a good one artistically speaking too, as the ballroom was acoustically better-suited to the quite intimate torch songs. It was however, trumpeter Freddie Hubbard's "Mr. Clean" which opened the set. Trumpeter Florent Briquet, pianist Benjamin Rando, electric bassist Simon Taileu, and drummer Cedric Bec gave an energized, hard-grooving rendition of this hard bop classic, before strings and Galice took their places on the stage.

The romance, blues and lyricism of the French songbook make it every bit as suited to jazz interpretations as its more famous American counterpart, and the combination of Gallice's seductive Gallic delivery and the quartet's swinging jazz aesthetic bathed classic French popular songs in a new light. Gallice's ability to make songs written half a century ago or more sound contemporary, and to blend them convincingly with recent pop songs—both French and American—spoke volumes about her vocal and arranging skills. The sparing use of strings lent their interjections weight, and underlined that this was a jazz band first and foremost.

Bianca Gallice

Gallice's renditions of the songs of singer/songwriters such as Claude Nougaro, Jacques Brel, Michel Legrand, Leo Chauliac and Charles Trenet, were clearly heartfelt. She also sang several numbers in English, Coolio's "Gangsta's Paradise," and Irving Berlin's pop hit from 1929, "Puttin on the Ritz"—a hit for clarinetist/bandleader Benny Goodman a decade later—though these were less effective vehicles for her voice. However, her take in English on the Red Evans/David A. Mann tune "No Moon at All" carried a sensual allure reminiscent of singer Julie London.

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