Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

454

Lou Donaldson: Good Gracious!

Jim Santella By

Sign in to view read count


The organ combo has a distinct sound, one like no other. Lou Donaldson discovered Grant Green and Big John Patton, recommended them to Blue Note (in effect, initiating their recording careers), and produced some mighty fine recordings in their company. Both Donaldson and guitarist Green have listed Charlie Parker as a prime influence, and it is immediately apparent in the up-tempo blues-based tunes.

Patton's foot pedals substitute, naturally, for the bass, and drummer Ben Dixon supplies an adequate beat through all six tracks. The session combines Donaldson's brand of bop with blues, balladry, and gospel. The title track is a fast blues with call & response, emotion-building repetition, and exciting solo work from saxophone, organ, and guitar. "Bad John" and Don Redman's "Cherry," are up-tempo blues-based affairs with heightened emotional appeal as well; Donaldson quotes "Frankie And Johnny" during his solo outing in "Bad John."

A gospel tune in 3/4 time, "The Holy Ghost" combines the organ, with its powerful church-like full harmony, and Donaldson's soothing, lyrical hymn-like melody to create a serene yet spicy stroll. Sustained organ chords and Dixon's brushes support the leader's sensitive ballad delivery on "Don't Worry `Bout Me." Donaldson wrote the bossa "Caracas" before the bossa nova craze. His dry tone, the repetitious drum rhythm, and the floating melody create a sound quite apart from the fire of the saxophonist's jump blues numbers. The three solo voices of saxophone, organ and guitar combine to offer a variety of gospel, ballad, bossa nova, and trademark blues. Recommended.

Title: Good Gracious! | Year Released: 1997 | Record Label: Blue Note Records

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Shop for Music

Start your music shopping from All About Jazz and you'll support us in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Read Sheer Reckless Abandon Album Reviews
Sheer Reckless Abandon
By John Kelman
May 19, 2019
Read Gratitude: Stage Door Live @ the Z Album Reviews
Gratitude: Stage Door Live @ the Z
By Jack Bowers
May 19, 2019
Read To My Brothers Album Reviews
To My Brothers
By Victor L. Schermer
May 19, 2019
Read Social Music Album Reviews
Social Music
By Roger Farbey
May 19, 2019
Read Circle Inside The Folds Album Reviews
Circle Inside The Folds
By John Eyles
May 18, 2019
Read Momentum Album Reviews
Momentum
By Jerome Wilson
May 18, 2019
Read Bonsai Club Album Reviews
Bonsai Club
By Roger Farbey
May 18, 2019