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Geri Allen Quartet: Philadelphia, USA, December 4, 2010

Victor L. Schermer By

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Geri Allen Quartet
Jazz Up Close Celebrates Thelonious Monk Series
Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, Perelman Theater
Philadelphia, PA

December 4, 2010

Once, when asked to define "jazz," Count Basie simply replied, "Tap your feet." At this December, 2010 concert, the fourth member of pianist Geri Allen's quartet turned out to do just that. Maurice Chestnut is a brilliant youthful tap dancer who works with a variety of music ensembles. In this concert performance at Philadelphia's Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, he utilized his feet and body movements to tap out rhythmic choruses that blended seamlessly and stunningly with Allen and her group. His tap dancing was supernatural in its virtuosity, and it was fascinating to see and hear how well it blended in with the music. Thelonious Monk, to whom this and the other Jazz Up Close concerts this year are dedicated, often danced on stage, so the occasion was ideal for Chestnut to show his wares. The intimate connection between dance and music couldn't have been manifested more clearly.

Allen is a jazz pianist of mountainous experience and skill; she has been around and done everything—including musicology, writing, and arranging. Allen likes to work with musicians who possess diverse capabilities and competencies that make for an interesting exchange of styles and ideas. Completing her group for this performance were bassist Kenny Davis and drummer Kassa Overall. Originally from Chicago, Davis is strongly influenced by the styles of Ray Brown, Paul Chambers, and Ron Carter—and, interestingly, the legendary electric bassist, Jaco Pastorius. Davis' classical training was evident in the precision and sound quality of his playing. Overall is one of a number of young drummers who, despite their youth, grasp the jazz idiom as if they are old-timers. He grew up with jazz in his Seattle home and, although he does hip hop, rap, electronica, and pop gigs, in Allen's group he artfully captured the jazz idioms of stride, swing, bebop, and hard bop, lending them his own unique flair.

The first set began with "Theloniously Speaking," composed by one of Allen's mentors, drummer Roy Brooks. Allen began with a laidback solo cadenza that demonstrated her great artistry, with a feel perhaps partly attributable to Kenny Barron, one of her teachers. Barron's influence could be felt in Allen's strong but mellow articulation, as well as her extended elaboration of ideas and motifs—a Barron hallmark. The cadenza had references to music that preceded and influenced Monk, complemented by Davis' walking, bouncing bass.

Next came a medley of two Monk tunes, "Introspection" and "Thelonious," where Chestnut's hot tap dancing included Monk's rotating dance or "ring shout." Davis soloed with rapid-fire, two-finger virtuosity, and Allen traded eights with Overall. "Ruby My Dear" began with another cadenza by Allen—melodic allusions alternating with super-fast lines—then stating the melody, with Tommy Flanagan-esque stylings. Here, Overall's sensitive touch complemented Allen well. "Rootie Tootie" rocked, again featuring Chestnut's astonishing dancing; it was clear that Chestnut was always listening to the music, and gearing his dance steps to what he was hearing. "Evidence" was done mostly in an up-tempo bebop mode, with Chestnut's taps and a knock-out drum solo.

The Jazz Up Close concerts feature a post-intermission discussion with the musicians, moderated by series curator/pianist Danilo Perez. Allen recounted her experiences in the Detroit music scene, recalling the mentoring presence of powerhouses like Roy Brooks, Marcus Belgrave, Harold McKinney, and Roy Walden. In response to Perez's asking how Allen got interested in Monk, she said that Roy Brooks had worked with Horace Silver, who knew Monk; additionally, pianist John Malachi, from the famous Billy Eckstine Orchestra, hooked Allen up with pianist Mary Lou Williams, who was close to Monk and many other jazz pianists of the time. Allen further stated that she enacted the role of Mary Lou Williams in a movie.

Why the tap dancing? Allen said that Roy Brook was a tap dancer. Moreover, Monk got up and danced, and jazz is dance music. Chestnut recalled that his father played Monk on the record player when he was a kid. Similarly, Overall said that Monk was his father's favorite musician, noting that some of Monk's rhythms are clavé-oriented two-against-three. When Perez asked what can be done to convey jazz to young people, Davis emphasized that it's important to keep teaching it correctly to younger players. Finally, Allen congratulated Perez on his Grammy nomination for Providencia (Mack Avenue, 2010).

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