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George Benson: From Chitlins to Chateaubriand to Caviar

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Producer Tommy LiPuma had a problem because the instrumentals were going along so great. He didn
In the summer of 2004 guitarist George Benson sat down unnoticed at the Baton Rouge Bar in Montreal and asked for a margarita. The Baton Rouge is a great restaurant haven for jazz goers and musicians attending the Festival International de Jazz de Montreal, aka The Montreal Jazz Festival. It just so happened that, as my family and I sat down at the bar for an afternoon brunch, I looked over to my left and recognized Benson as the gentleman ordering a drink.



Benson was there to play at Place des Arts' Salle Wilfred Pelletiere, and I said to him, "Welcome—Live at the Front Room—Brother Jack McDuff with George Benson, Joe Dukes, and Red Holloway. George fell out laughing saying, "Hey, were you there? I said my mom had brought the album home in 1963 and played "Rock Candy, with a burning guitar solo from the then-nineteen year-old Benson.



We took pictures, laughed and talked. We even talked about our brief acting careers. I had been his stand- in when he guest-starred on Mike Hammer in 1985.



George Benson and his guitar have been Circuit Court Riders (CC Riders), traveling from town-to-town spreading the jazz word both vocally and musically. They've sung and strummed their way throughout the whole Chitlin' Circuit. Chitlins to Chateaubriand have been Benson's diet for the past forty years, and now he's tasting the Caviar Elite venues around the world: the festival shores of Newport to North Sea, Umbria, Montreux and Toronto. From the Front Room to the Hollywood Bowl to Montreal's Wilfred Pelletier.



At the time, Benson was finishing an exhausting six-week tour of Europe. He had the Montreal Jazz Festival, North America's phenomenal eleven-day tour-de-force festival, and Los Angeles' new Kodak Center as his final stops before taking a well deserved three week vacation. He said that he was getting a little tired of touring, and was possibly considering slowing down.



He's played with Jack McDuff, Lou Donaldson, Hank Mobley, Jimmy Smith, Stanley Turrentine, Freddie Hubbard, Lee Morgan, Herbie Hancock and others. He's sung with Al Jarreau, Jon Hendricks, Sarah Vaughan and Count Basie. Benson's singing talents are known world-wide, but it's his guitar playing that scorched the vinyl grooves of Prestige, Blue Note, CTI, A&M, Columbia, and Warner Records in his early days.



Unbelievably, Benson had never heard his million-seller "This Masquerade," nor had he heard of the song's composer, Leon Russell. Most fans have never heard "Rock Candy, Lou Donaldson's Midnight Creeper (Blue Note, 1968), Alligator Boogaloo (Blue Note, 1967), Freddie Hubbard's First Light (CTI, 1971) or Sky Dive (CTI, 1972), or Stanley Turrentine's Sugar—music where Benson's guitar played an integral part.



George Benson's 2004 Montreal Jazz Festival interview reveals secrets about his love for the guitar playing that was his bread and butter before his singing prowess became renowned worldwide.



Some unique ironies have occurred throughout Benson's. Back in Pittsburgh when he was seven years old, Benson picked up his dad's guitar and tried playing it when told not to. His dad bought one for him to learn on, and soon he was confident enough to play at parties and in church for a few dollars. Word spread fast and by nineteen, Brother Jack McDuff heard through the grapevine that a teenager in Pittsburgh could play guitar so well that everyone said he was singing through his strings. And soon after, he began singing with his voice as well.



Benson has a magnetic camaraderie with his audience and quickly establishes it by show-casing his guitar virtuosity—singing on his strings and gradually blending his voice into his numerous golden hits, including "Give Me the Night, "This Masquerade, "On Broadway and "Moody's Mood For Love. Smooth jazzers know these songs by heart and recognize the music melodies as those of the singer/guitarist's signature collection. Benson performed them all at Montreal's Salle Wilfred Pelletiere in Montreal. Dressed in silver slacks with a red shirt and combination red and black satin jacket, he had the Pelletier audience ensconced in guitar rhythms and songs



After his stunning two-hour performance, Benson, his manager and I "Breezed" thru a retrospective time capsule of his career, first as guitarist, and then more successfully as a world class vocalist.

All About Jazz: George, we go back to about 1962 and your first experiences with Jack McDuff ..You were twenty years old. Here we are in 2004, what was that experience like?

George Benson: I was just nineteen years old. Actually, it was 1963 when Bro Jack McDuff took me to New York and I made my first guitar record with him as part of his group—Jack McDuff Quartet. And it was an incredible experience, man. Jack was a very tough bandleader—He stayed on my case all the time, just kept putting pressure on me. He said to me, "You ain't doing this right. You need to put a little bit more blues in your playing. Your tone is too thin and your rhythm ain't as good as it should be.



But by the time I got to New York his manager heard the band, and when he said, "Man, your band sounds better...I think we ought to go into the studio and make a record. So we went into the studio and recorded this record that had "Rock Candy" on it---Live At the Front Room (Prestige, 1963). And man, Jack had another career. It made us famous to do the Chitlin' or jazz organ circuit.

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