Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

356

Daniel Humair / Joachim Kuhn / Tony Malaby: Full Contact

Martin Longley By

Sign in to view read count
This transatlantic collaboration features the long-established partnership of Swiss sticksman Daniel Humair and German pianist Joachim K ühn, but the presence of saxophonist Tony Malaby further establishes the latter's fast-ascending status outside of the US. The reedman isn't blowing as belligerently as usual, tempted into exposing his softer side, his warm tone denuded of its lime-scale textures.

The material is clearly composed, but in such a manner that much of the trio's interaction sounds completely improvised (there are pieces penned by each member). The language of the spontaneous is becoming so advanced (or even ingrained) that it's becoming increasingly difficult to discern the moment when one form flows into the other. The disc's opening skirmish reveals all three players in a swiftly overlapping state and then Humair takes a drum solo, followed by more trio flooding and then, in the name of symmetry, a piano solo. Humair's skins are tonally rich down at the low end, helping fill in any absence felt (imagined or not) by the absence of a bassist.

All three are constantly restless and enquiring, continually seeking satisfaction, with themes and solos smudging into each other in a blur of hyperactivity. On the title track, K ühn takes off on a crazed scamper, with Malaby entering at what turns out to be the piece's peak, acting as a closing force. Then "Ghisl ène" is a staccato head-banger, with complete equality for all three players, as they intuitively negotiate outbursts of either dominance or passivity, switching roles in an instant, energized, but also moving through a varied range of dynamic stages.

Track Listing: Buried Head; Jim Dine; Full Contact; Oasis; Ghislène; Salina; Effervescent Springbox; Sleeping Angels.

Personnel: Daniel Humair: drums; Joachim Kühn: piano; Tony Malaby: saxophones.

Title: Full Contact | Year Released: 2008 | Record Label: Bee Jazz

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Upcoming Shows

Date Detail Price
Jan25Fri
DANIEL HUMAIR
Théâtre De Fontblanche
Vitrolles, France
€12 - 16
Jan31Thu
Daniel Humair, Le Maître De La Batterie
Bal Blomet
Paris, France
€25
Feb1Fri
Daniel Humair Trio
Duc Des Lombards
Paris, France
€30

Shop

Start your shopping here and you'll support All About Jazz in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Read The Martian's Playground Album Reviews
The Martian's Playground
By Geno Thackara
January 24, 2019
Read Ex Nihilo Album Reviews
Ex Nihilo
By Chris May
January 24, 2019
Read Path Of Totality Album Reviews
Path Of Totality
By Roger Farbey
January 24, 2019
Read Time Like This Album Reviews
Time Like This
By John Sharpe
January 24, 2019
Read Bulería Brooklyniana Album Reviews
Bulería Brooklyniana
By Dan Bilawsky
January 23, 2019
Read At The Hill Of James Magee Album Reviews
At The Hill Of James Magee
By Mark Corroto
January 23, 2019
Read Stomping Off From Greenwood Album Reviews
Stomping Off From Greenwood
By Mike Jurkovic
January 23, 2019