331

Fifth Annual Longwood Gardens Wine and Jazz Festival, June 4, 2011

Victor L. Schermer By

Sign in to view read count
Fifth Annual Longwood Gardens Wine and Jazz Festival
Kennett Square, PA
June 4, 2011
Longwood Gardens is a horticultural conservancy spread over the countryside in Kennett Square, Chester County, PA. It is one of those beautiful meccas with the potential to serve memorably for a summer music festival, as anyone who has attended Juan Les Pins, Tanglewood, or Ravennia can attest.

Tom Warner, who has done excellent jazz and classical music programming for major concert halls, including Philadelphia's Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, has brought his knowledge, skills, and ambition to the task of making Longwood the home for major events. In particular, as part of a series entitled "Notes from the Forest," the Fifth Annual Wine and Jazz Festival featured four groups that reflected Warner's taste for great music. The Tony Miceli Quartet, the Kenny Barron, the New York Voices, and the Ravi Coltrane all provided a stellar and varied afternoon of jazz to suit all tastes, just as the tasting tents for the local Pennsylvania vineyards, lining the back edge of the concert meadow, did for wine lovers.

The concert began with vibraphonist Tony Miceli and his frequent associates—pianist Tom Lawton, bassist Matthew Parrish and drummer Butch Reed—in a mellow set appropriate for a relaxed beginning. A highlight of the set was Milt Jackson's "Blues in C Minor," featuring the deep and rich interpretations that have earned Miceli the increasing respect of listeners and musicians alike. An extraordinary musician and teacher in Philadelphia for three decades, Miceli is beginning to gain a well-deserved place on the international jazz scene. His seasoned group provided capable backup, but it was Miceli who shone in the set.

Following a relaxing break, The Kenny Barron Trio, with bassist Kiyoshi Kitagawa and drummer Johnathan Blake, delivered a rock-solid performances, allowing them to display their remarkable collective skills. Barron, a jazz icon who has worked with many of the greats in the U.S. and abroad, has, in the process, acquired his own unique and easily recognizable sense of swing, drive, and sound with unwavering refinement and discipline.

Standards like "I Hear a Rhapsody" and "Blue Moon," as well as a hard-driving Barron original, "New York Attitude" gave the pianist ample opportunity for the kind of improvisational skill that has earned him a place among the National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Masters. In addition, his stunning workup of Thelonious Monk's "Shuffle Boil" allowed him to display a grasp of rhythmic and harmonic complexities well beyond the expected—even for him. Kitagawa pushed technique to the edge with incredible lines of thirds that would have had Monk in a spin, while Blake kept a firm and relentless rhythm throughout—doing double service with Ravi Coltrane's Quartet later in the afternoon.

Spice and contrast were provided by the New York Voices, a quartet of vocalists that has exemplified the vocalese tradition of Lambert, Hendricks & Ross for over two decades. Singers Kim Nazarian, Peter Eldridge, Daemon Meader (who doubles on tenor sax), and Lauren Kinahan delivererd a grooving set of lively standards, beginning with a nod to the good weather, "On a Clear Day (You Can See Forever)," and covering a lot of musical ground from the hippie era's "Surrey on Down to a Stone Cold Picnic" to Louis Prima's "Sing, Sing, Sing," with some jazz standards like "Love Me or Leave Me" and "No Moon at All" thrown in for good measure.



The group outdid itself on John Coltrane's "Moment's Notice," which included transcribed Trane solos done in unison vocalese. The singers and their backup musicians kept up amiably with some very difficult changes. Whoever does the arrangements for this ensemble deserves a lion's share of credit for their success, the overall impact making the difficult or impossible seem like a cakewalk.

Finally, In the late afternoon, The Ravi Coltrane Quartet came on, this incarnation featuring trumpeter Ralph Alessi, bassist Lonnie Plaxico, and drummer Johnathan Blake. Both Ravi Coltrane and Alessi are known for their rich exploitation of free jazz and post-modern jazz developments, and on this occasion provided the only true cutting edge musical experience.

Tags

Related Video

comments powered by Disqus

More Articles

Read Jay Phelps at the Harrow Arts Centre Live Reviews Jay Phelps at the Harrow Arts Centre
by Barry Witherden
Published: July 25, 2017
Read The Seth Yacovone Blues Trio At Red Square Live Reviews The Seth Yacovone Blues Trio At Red Square
by Doug Collette
Published: July 23, 2017
Read Earl Thomas At Biscuits & Blues Live Reviews Earl Thomas At Biscuits & Blues
by Walter Atkins
Published: July 22, 2017
Read My Morning Jacket on The Green At Shelburne Museum Live Reviews My Morning Jacket on The Green At Shelburne Museum
by Doug Collette
Published: July 22, 2017
Read Garana Jazz Festival 2017 Live Reviews Garana Jazz Festival 2017
by Nenad Georgievski
Published: July 20, 2017
Read "Steve Reich @ 80: Music for 18 Musicians" Live Reviews Steve Reich @ 80: Music for 18 Musicians
by C. Andrew Hovan
Published: March 29, 2017
Read "Tony Bennett at Birmingham Symphony Hall" Live Reviews Tony Bennett at Birmingham Symphony Hall
by David Burke
Published: July 5, 2017
Read "Bray Jazz Festival 2017" Live Reviews Bray Jazz Festival 2017
by Ian Patterson
Published: May 9, 2017
Read "TD Ottawa Jazz Festival 2017" Live Reviews TD Ottawa Jazz Festival 2017
by John Kelman
Published: June 29, 2017
Read "November Music 2016" Live Reviews November Music 2016
by Henning Bolte
Published: December 13, 2016

Join the staff. Writers Wanted!

Develop a column, write album reviews, cover live shows, or conduct interviews.