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914

February 2006

AAJ Staff By

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Coltrane switched to soprano for his original "Coincide , which began as a duet with Strickland, who used his cowbell to set up the Latin groove. Perdomo joined in, beginning with Jarrett-ish introspection over Gress' prominent bass line before forging straight ahead. Coltrane dug in, after a Gress solo, weaving long intricate lines out of the pretty melody, displaying a bell-like tone on the straight horn. He switched back to tenor for Gress' "Away , snapping off a brisk ballad tempo that gradually built in intensity. Perdomo laid out for most of the saxophonist's intense solo, saving his energy for his own impressive outing, following which Coltrane introduced the trio to the appreciative crowd, before blowing a warm flowing out chorus.

Young brassmen Maurice Brown and Sean Jones went toe-to-toe in an old fashioned after hours "Night of the Cookers session at Sweet Rhythm (Jan. 12th), that was an exciting testament to the enduring vitality of the hard bop idiom. Joining an allstar ensemble featuring Donald Harrison, Mulgrew Miller, Nat Reeves and Louis Hayes, with special guest Steve Nelson, the two trumpeters traded incendiary solos in an electrifying set, the likes of which has not been heard since the days when Art Blakey regularly held court in the room. Harrison stomped off "Confirmation to start the second show and after the altoist and Nelson set the blistering pace, Jones weighed in with a mature articulate solo, followed by Brown, who played with his typical exuberance. Throughout the number Miller, Reeves and Hayes relentlessly prodded the soloists to extreme heights.

After a short 'conference', Miller and Nelson played the opening call-and-response melody of "Moanin' and Harrison was off to the races again, with Hayes playing the classic Blakey shuffle rhythm. The horns riffed hotly behind Nelson's solo, before Jones stepped out front blowing sweet and low. Brown followed, screaming and growling on his horn. On the set's ballad, "Misty , he showed that he was also capable of tastefully restrained emotion. The set ended just after 3 am with an up-tempo rendition of "Oleo on which everyone burned through the changes on top of Hayes' "Blues March -ing rhythm.

~Russ Musto

Recommended New Releases

· Omer Avital - Asking No Permission: The Smalls Years Vol. One (Smalls)

· Bill Frisell - Further East/Further West (billfrisell.com)

· Sam Rivers/Ben Street/Kresten Osgood - Violet Violets (Stunt)

· Gregory Tardy - The Truth (SteepleChase)

· Assif Tsahar/Cooper-Moore/Hamid Drake - Lost Brother (Hopscotch)

· Mary Lou Williams Collective - Zodiac Suite Revisited (Mary Records)

~David Adler, NY@Night Columnist, AllAboutJazz.com

· Omer Avital - Asking No Permission: The Smalls Years Vol. One (Smalls)

· Ab Baars - Kinda Dukish (Wig)

· Miles Davis - The Cellar Door Sessions 1970 (Columbia-Legacy)

· Ras Deshen Abatte/Yitzhak Yedid - From Ethiopian Music to Contemporary Jazz (AB)

· John McNeil - East Coast Cool (OmniTone)

· Stephen Riley - Inside Out (Steeplechase)

~Laurence Donohue-Greene, Managing Editor, AllAboutJazz-New York

· Jeff Arnal/Nate Wooley/ Reuben Radding/Seth Misterka - Transit (Clean Feed)

· Eddie Gale - Vision Festival X, NYC (s/r)

· Vinny Golia - Sfumato (Clean Feed)

· Manuel Mengis Gruppe 6 - Into the Barn (Hatology)

· Tisziji Munoz - Love At First Sound (Anami Music)

· Ray Russell - Goodbye Svengali (Cuneiform)

~Bruce Gallanter, Proprietor, Downtown Music Gallery

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