All About Jazz

Home » Articles » CD/LP/Track Review

4

Scott Fields / Jeffrey Lependorf: Everything is in the instructions

Eyal Hareuveni By

Sign in to view read count
Composer of contemporary chamber music and opera and certified master of the Japanese shakuhachi flute Jeffrey Lependorf cites an insightful incident he had with iconoclastic composer John Cage that reveals much about typical misconceptions about what is right and what is wrong in music and art. Lebendorf wanted Cage to clarify his vague instructions for a theater piece he was assigned to assist a choreographer to prepare. But Cage insisted, kindly enough, that "everything is in the instructions." After the performance of this piece, and following the standing ovation, Lependorf asked again Cage for his opinion, and Cage, typically but again, kindly enough, answered that he "did everything wrong."

Back to the present. Lependorf's collaboration with idiosyncratic guitarist and composer in avant-jazz and New Music Scott Fields does not bother itself with questions about what sound right or wrong. All sounds are beautiful, as Cage once said, and these two masterful and resourceful musicians do not attempt to replicate any form of new world music or new-agey, meditative kind of interplay (as the Shakuhachi is associated with the Zen school of Buddhism), or to follow any familiar concept.

The two musicians suggest how innovative and original music of the 21st century can sound. Music that patiently, almost methodically, explores new timbres and sonic options; uses silence as basic element; is compassionate but never sentimental, gifted with dark humor but not emotionally detached; and always demonstrating deep listening and careful sensitivity to the the most fragile qualities of the music making process and and its immediate options.

The improvised pieces "Objects in Relation to Other Objects" and "The Politics of Solitude" are masterful expressions of the high art of these two musicians. Music that is comprised from brief, abstract and subtle articulations, loosely connected, but eventually accumulate to profound, mesmerizing pieces. The intimate, chamber interplay on "Oh yes" and "Tip bloused" is simply timeless with its thoughtful references to classical, contemporary and East-Asian music. The surprising cover of John Coltrane's "Naima" is a moving tribute to the great master, performed with deep emotional gratitude but without reverence, wisely sketching this timeless classic.

Unique masterpiece.

Track Listing: She comes from nowhere; Terror babies; Objects in Relation to Other Objects; Oh, yes; The Politics of Solitude; Tip bloused; Advice for some young man in the year 2064 A.D.; Naima.

Personnel: Scott Fields: acoustic guitar; Jeffrey Lependorf: shakuhachi.

Title: Everything is in the instructions | Year Released: 2013 | Record Label: Ayler Records

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Related Articles

Read Alive In The East? CD/LP/Track Review
Alive In The East?
by Chris May
Published: June 22, 2018
Read Love Stone CD/LP/Track Review
Love Stone
by Dan Bilawsky
Published: June 22, 2018
Read Empty Castles CD/LP/Track Review
Empty Castles
by Mark Corroto
Published: June 22, 2018
Read Myths and Morals CD/LP/Track Review
Myths and Morals
by Jakob Baekgaard
Published: June 22, 2018
Read The Sum Of My Pardon CD/LP/Track Review
The Sum Of My Pardon
by Jim Olin
Published: June 22, 2018
Read Postcard Collection CD/LP/Track Review
Postcard Collection
by Jack Bowers
Published: June 21, 2018
Read "One Night at Morey's: 1968" CD/LP/Track Review One Night at Morey's: 1968
by C. Michael Bailey
Published: June 10, 2018
Read "Live In London" CD/LP/Track Review Live In London
by Dan Bilawsky
Published: November 8, 2017
Read "Art in the Age of Automation" CD/LP/Track Review Art in the Age of Automation
by Geno Thackara
Published: August 21, 2017
Read "Drifting Home" CD/LP/Track Review Drifting Home
by Jim Worsley
Published: November 7, 2017
Read "Steamdome" CD/LP/Track Review Steamdome
by Chris May
Published: June 13, 2018
Read "Omara" CD/LP/Track Review Omara
by Roger Farbey
Published: February 3, 2018