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Elio Villafranca: Five Islands & A Revolt

John Ephland By

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My main interest is to write a strong piece of music that could stand on its own, without the need of a soloist. When I’m composing I think more like a classical composer than a jazz musician.
The setting was Systems Two, a well-known, state-of-the-art recording studio in Brooklyn. The sessions, occurring over five days in May (7-11) 2017, were set up to record Cuban pianist/composer Elio Villafranca's sixth album, the elaborate and thoroughly rehearsed double-CD Cinque (artistShare), the music previously performed in shows at Lincoln Center in 2015.

Present at Lincoln Center and at Systems Two was a well-coordinated team of musicians, including Steve Turre (trombone, conch shells), Greg Tardy (tenor saxophone, clarinet), Vincent Herring (alto saxophone, flute), Freddie Hendrix (trumpet), Todd Marcus (bass clarinet), Ricky Rodriguez (acoustic bass), Leyla McCalla (cello, banjo, vocals) and percussionists Jonathan Troncoso, Arturo Stable and Miguel Valdes. Drummer Lewis Nash was the only new member for the recording sessions. Later, in New Orleans, Villafranca added overdubs from Don Vappie on banjo and Leyla McCalla's vocal for his version of the Haitian song "Messi Bondye." Back in Brooklyn, trumpeter Wynton Marsalis provided additional overdubs. Narration was an additional element, adding some background context about the music and history.

As for the sessions themselves, what emerged from day to day remained fairly consistent: long stretches with breaks interspersed for meals and musician rotations, the overall tenor of the sessions being somewhat serious, focused yet laced with a mix of laughter and looseness. Villafranca seem to spend as much time behind the glass, if not more, conducting from behind the main mixing board, entering the attractive, wood-paneled studio when the music required his piano playing. Organized and flexible, with multiple tasks to attend to, Villafranca the leader received superb technical support from sound engineer/studio owner Mike Marciano and Jazz At Lincoln Center's Jason Olaine.

The recipient of a 4.5 star review from DownBeat and winner as Rising Star on keyboards in the magazine's August Critics Poll issue, Villafranca was more than enthused to wax on about the creation of this epic production.

All About Jazz: Where do you get your ideas, from thematic material to instrumentation? And do you consider this new project to be consistent with previous efforts, or a real departure?

Elio Villafranca: My ideas for thematic materials come from a variety of sources, although I can safely say that my main three are Afro-Caribbean music, classical music and jazz. I find myself coming back to my early childhood memories where I was exposed to the drum for the first time, in a form of Congolese music know as tambor yuka. This form of music is very rare in Cuba and it is only practiced in a few towns in the region of Pinar del Rio, such as "El Guayabo" in San Luis where I was born. The drums used to play in this tradition are made out of the trunk of the avocado tree, which is carefully hollowed out, then an animal skin is nailed to one of its ends. Also studying at the Instituto Superior de Arte in Havana in Cuba heavily influenced my approach to composition and instrumentation as well as thematic materials. During my years there, half of my teachers were Russian and the study of Russian classical composers was at the forefront of my musical education. One thing that I rarely mention is my early education in visual arts and guitar. My first contact with the arts was through painting. I was born near a Casa de Culture, where I received early training in visual arts before picking up the guitar. I love the concept of colors which I try to transfer into my music by exploring with different instrumentation formats. The idea of colors, in combination with my classical music training, informed my selection for the instrumentation for this project, composed of alto and soprano saxophones/flute, tenor saxophone/clarinet, trumpet, trombone/shells, and bass clarinet. 

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