Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

65

The Yockomo All Stars: Dew Drop Out

Ed Kopp By

Sign in to view read count
The Yockamo All Stars are 11 of New Orleans' finest jazz musicians, and on Dew Drop Out they take elements from 1950s Crescent City R&B and blend them with spirited second-line jazz. The result is a joyous, danceable recording that really captures the fun-loving spirit of the Crescent City.

The Yockamo All Stars include guitarist and leader Mark Bingham, bassist Walter Payton (Nicholas Payton's father), drummer Herlin Riley, piano and organ man Glenn Patscha, the great young alto-saxophonist Jesse Davis, tenor saxman Tim Green, bartione saxman Reggie Houston, tenor saxophonist Clarence Johnson III, guitarist June Yamagishi, and two of my favorite Crescent City musicians, trumpeter LeRoy Jones and his partner, the trombonist Craig Klein. These guys have played with the likes of Wynton Marsalis, Harry Connick Jr., Fats Domino, Clarence Gatemouth Brown, and many others, so we're talkin' real professionals here.

Dew Drop Out resonates with the same mix of innocence, bawdiness and funk as the finest New Orleans R&B, but it's also completely faithful to The Big Easy's rich jazz heritage. With a few exceptions (Wynton Marsalis being the most notable), New Orleans is one of the few places where jazz is more celebratory than cerebral. Second-line jazz is meant to be played in the streets and bars, not in conservatories.

Included on Dew Drop Out are four jazzed-up covers of R&B classics and eight new compositions, all infused with strong doses of jazzified R&B energy. Highlights include the funky "Blow, Blow Tenor," the bluesy title track, an organ bolero called "Jambolero," a great jazz version of Clarence "Frogman" Henry's "Ain't Got No Home," and my favorite, a down-and-dirty take on "I Hear You Knockin'."

The Yockomo All Stars play a brand of party jazz that's as meaty as it is fun. Not only is Dew Drop Out a fitting tribute to The Crescent City, it's as effective an amalgam of R&B and jazz as you're likely to hear.

Title: Dew Drop Out | Year Released: 1998 | Record Label: Hannibal Records

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Shop for Music

Start your music shopping from All About Jazz and you'll support us in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Read Hastings Jazz Collective/Shadow Dances Album Reviews
Hastings Jazz Collective/Shadow Dances
By Dan McClenaghan
May 21, 2019
Read Crowded Heart Album Reviews
Crowded Heart
By Nicholas F. Mondello
May 21, 2019
Read That's a Computer Album Reviews
That's a Computer
By Jerome Wilson
May 21, 2019
Read All I Do Is Bleed Album Reviews
All I Do Is Bleed
By Paul Naser
May 21, 2019
Read LE10 18-05 Album Reviews
LE10 18-05
By Karl Ackermann
May 20, 2019
Read Remembering Miles Album Reviews
Remembering Miles
By Dan McClenaghan
May 20, 2019
Read Merry Peers Album Reviews
Merry Peers
By Bruce Lindsay
May 20, 2019