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Delving Into the Deep Blue

Delving Into the Deep Blue
Trish Richardson By

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You always try to get better and get closer to the source of your inspiration--hearing more and being able to play it more accurately.
"Blood may be thicker than water, but you can't live without water." class="f-right"> —Novelist Jane Porter



While the members of Deep Blue Organ Trio were not brought together by shared parentage, guitarist Bobby Broom, drummer Chris Rockingham and organist Chris Foreman share a closeness, mutual respect, and loyalty that many families would envy. Their bond and brotherhood extends beyond their music. These men love what they do and they love the men that they get to do it with.

Like a good family, no one member tries to steal the spotlight from the others. The trio generously allows each one of them to shine while appreciating each of their individual talents. When asked who the leader of the band is, both Broom and Rockingham respectfully credit the other. Though the band is named after Broom, onstage, the guitarist generously introduces Rockingham as the leader. Rockingham says, "Bobby will be the first to tell you, I put this group together. This is sort of a back door way of telling you how much we love each other. Chris and I have been playing together for so long, but Bobby's done the stuff that he's done. So we have no problem with 'Bobby Broom and the Deep Blue Organ Trio.' I have no problem with that at all, because it's Bobby. If it was someone else, it might be an issue. He's a wonderful, wonderful person and a wonderful player. Chris and I have just been together longer, but we feel the same about Bobby as we do about each other. [Foreman agrees] We all have our roles and our jobs to do. When it's time to look to him, he delivers. When it's time for him to look to me, I deliver. When it's time to look to Chris, he delivers. We're cool with each other. That's just the way it is."

"Whatever it takes for us to get the job done," adds Foreman.

"No room for egos here," continues Rockingham.

For Broom, life as a burgeoning jazz guitarist began in early childhood, at around five or six. "I just really loved music and I was way into it, more than I ever realized. As a kid, you don't realize the depth of your feelings, but from my early, early childhood, I knew every instrument part and the words. I thought I must have really been paying attention back then. Then at eight my godfather gave me a guitar and it had four strings. I didn't even know what it was. Turned out it was a tenor guitar, the next step from a banjo. I wasn't interested in it, really."

However, by age twelve, Broom had a completely different outlook about the instrument. "One morning I woke up and just had this new thing: 'Dad I want a guitar.' I don't know where it came from. It was seemingly out of the blue. It was just this burning thing, like I had to have it. So my dad bought me a guitar and a mike, but I told him I didn't want the mike. He said, 'Well I don't know any guitar players that make it just by playing the guitar.'"

So did the microphone help turn Broom into a vocalist? "I've tried singing, but I don't like the way I sound. People have told me to do voiceovers or do radio and I'm like, 'Really?' But I don't hear that, so maybe I can sing and I just don't know it."

Broom focused his attention towards jazz mainly because he often heard it on the radio growing up, especially pianist Herbie Hancock and the Headhunters. Prior to that, one of Broom's childhood friends and a teacher both tried to steer Broom in that direction, but the guitarist showed little interest. "I had a teacher from age thirteen to sixteen who was a jazz player. He taught me about Wes Montgomery and tried to get me to listen to Wes but I never followed through. I was not really interested. I also had a friend who played jazz drums and he tried to get me to listen to records, too, but I was just not into it. But then when I listened to these people on the radio, I thought there might be something in jazz that I liked. So I went to the record store and asked who was doing it on the guitar like Herbie Hancock and Grover Washington, Jr., and the guy told me, 'George Benson.'"

So what did Broom think of Benson's playing? "The freedom of George's style and all the music that I could hear in it was what really attracted me. It was this form of self-expression that I was really attracted to. I thought if I could make myself one day feel some of the emotions that I feel when I am listening to him, that was what I wanted to pursue." And has that pursuit been realized? "I feel in some ways that I've accomplished that, but it's a never-ending kind of thing. You always try to get better and get closer to the source of your inspiration—hearing more and being able to play it more accurately. All those kinds of things. It is a never-ending quest. But just in terms of the emotions that I've been able to feel from playing music, yeah, I think I've gotten there."

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