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David Binney: Underground Tremors

Ian Patterson By

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There are recordings that constitute a personal high watermark for a composer; then there are, less frequently, recordings that mark an era. Graylen Epicenter (2011), alto saxophonist David Binney's latest recording on his own label, Mythology Records, is both. For more than two decades, this exhilarating alto saxophonist has made a string of absorbing recordings as leader that have cemented his reputation as one of the most exciting and original musicians/composers in New York.

By his own admission, Binney has never put more energy into anything as he has for Graylen Epicenter, aided by regular Binney collaborators pianist Craig Taborn, bassist Eivind Opsvik, drummers Brian Blade and Dan Weiss, saxophonist Chris Potter, trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire, guitarist Wayne Krantz and percussionists Kenny Wollesen and Rogerio Bocatto. The energy levels are high and the playing intuitive and incendiary. Binney's own playing is inspired, and as he relates, more relaxed than at any time previously on record.

The compositions on Graylen Epicenter are epic in construction, and reveal more of Binney's everyday listening habits than previously. "If you dropped a needle on the record, at one point it would sound like a jazz record and at another point it might sound like you're listening to a rock record," Binney explains. The pop element is provided by vocalist Gretchen Parlato, whose contribution to the music is significant. Krantz leaves a rockier imprint, with one of his best solos on record. Clearly, all the musicians are inspired by Binney's writing, which is episodic, flowing and dramatic.

If Graylen Epicenter marks a high point in David Binney's discography thus far, then it also stands as one of the best jazz recordings of the last 20 years. On it, Binney's ability to seamlessly weave hard-blowing jazz with nuances of pop, rock, blues, choral airs, and meditative or abstract passages results in emotionally charged music which digs its claws into you from the highly original opening salvo—and what an opening!— but which refuses to let go, long after the 75 absorbing minutes have ended. Simply put, Graylen Epicenter is a classic of our time.

All About Jazz: Did you have a very clear concept of what you wanted with Graylen Epicenter from the outset?

David Binney: My concept came from knowing who I wanted to use on the record. Initially I knew I was going to use Brian Blade and Craig Taborn and Eivind Opsvik. I also had a week of gigs and teaching in Europe, where I was bringing seven people over, including Wayne Krantz, Ambrose Akinmusire, Gretchen Parlato and Dan Weiss. So last summer I had these two groups working, who I was going to write music for, and I knew I'd probably record it. I was writing with them in mind. Once you start recording the music then you see how things come about. Things change too, and I started to think about adding other people, percussion and other things.

AAJ: You tend to play with the same circle of musicians, and you use them again on Graylen Epicenter. How often are you impressed by a new voice in New York?

DB: I'm pretty connected to the young scene in New York, and I always have been, so it's pretty often that I hear a young voice that I get excited about, especially in the last few years.

AAJ: The name of the CD is intriguing. Where does it come from?

DB: The name is just completely made up. As with the music, I'm just concerned with sounds. I hadn't named any of the tunes, even after playing them and recording them. I was going into the studio to master the record, and you have to have the name by then because they basically burn them into the CD, so on the subway train on the way in I was trying to think of names. It just came into my head, and I don't know why. When I got to the studio I said to the engineer, Mike Marciano: "Mike, what do you think of this name, Graylen Epicenter?" He said: "I really like it. What's it mean?" I told him I just liked the way it sounds.

It's interesting, because once you do something like that it takes on a life of its own, and once I gave it to the artist [Howie Shia] he drew all these things based on the name and listening to the music. It's really cool. I like coming up with things that mean nothing, and then people put some meaning on it.

AAJ: Is it strange that people put meaning on your music that you perhaps don't feel is there?

DB: That's a good question, actually. With Graylen Epicenter people want to know what it means, and they want to know the story behind it. That's a problem I have a lot of the time, especially with the grants situation, at least in the States; they always want you to describe your music with words, and for me that's not important. For me, it's just feeling—it's just about sounds.

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