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Dave Holland: Consummate Bassist

Lazaro Vega By

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This interview was first published at All About Jazz in May 1999 and is part of our ongoing effort to archive pre-database material.

Bassist Dave Holland brings the flexible structures and varied instrumental colors of his Grammy nominated Quintet to several Michigan locations in the second week of April. On the 7th the group presents an afternoon masterclass at the University of Michigan followed by an evening performance at the Bird of Paradise Jazz Club in Ann Arbor. On Thursday, April 8th they'll be at the Dalton Center Recital Hall, Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo. Then Friday, April 9th Holland's "Points of View" quintet closes the 1998-99 season of the Classic Jazz Series at the St. Cecilia Music Society's Royce Auditorium, 24 Ransom Ave. NE, Grand Rapids, MI. Tickets for the Grand Rapids concert are $17 and available through the Broadway Theatre Guild. On April 10th the quintet will be heard at a private, catered party in a comfortable East Grand Rapids living room. The following night, they'll play at the Knitting Factory in New York.

Blue Lake Public Radio's Lazaro Vega spoke by phone with Holland at his home in Saugerties, New York.

Lazaro Vega: The last time your were in Grand Rapids, 1996, was with Herbie Hancock's band featuring drummer Gene Jackson and saxophonist Craig Handy.

Dave Holland: We had a lot of fun during that time. We did a lot of touring with that group.

LV: So, you're in a residency at Eastman now?

DH: No, I finished that. That was last week. I'm home now. Just got back a couple of days ago, and I'm just taking a few days rest and then I'll be getting ready to go back out on tour with the band again.

LV: Well, congratulations on the Grammy nomination.

DH: Thank you. Thank you. We were very pleased with that. Yes, it's nice to have the work recognized and I'm really particularly happy with this group and these individuals. They're outstanding players and they really work beautifully together and the music is very much, I think, appropriate for this group of people. There's a nice relationship between the musicians who are playing this particular music. It's a good time to be working with this group.

LV: It's interesting, too, to kind of compare the band's you had in the 1980's to this group. Especially the trombone: Julian Priester compared to Robin Eubanks is kind of interesting.

DH: Yes. Yes.

LV: Would you draw any musical differences for me, or...

DH: No. I don't usually like to compare musicians. They're both really excellent trombonists. They just have their own unique individual styles, which is the great thing about this music: all the different approaches that there are, you know. I have a great deal of fun playing with both of them. They're both excellent musicians.

LV: I wasn't trying to get into anything negative there.

DH: No, I know that. I don't know quite know how to speak of them in comparison, you know. I can speak about their individual qualities.

LV: As a bandleader, this new band, how do you feel it compares to what you had been doing in the 1980's with the other group?

DH: It's kind of a continuation of it. In my mind, anyway, the music is a continuous stream of things that happens. One develops into another and new connections are made and new things are happening. I see a slight difference in the kind of compositions we're working on now. The forms are perhaps a little more developed than what we were using in the '80s. Along with that, I think a lot of what we learned from the 1980's group is being put to work now. So there's continuity there. We're kind of building on things. And Robin Eubanks was in that band, in fact. The last record we did with that quintet was called Razor's Edge and Robin was on that particular record. He took over from Julian in, I think, 1986.

LV: So you've had a long time to develop a musical rapport with him.

DH: Well, yeah. Robin I think the longest of all the members of the group. Steve Nelson was in a previous quartet that I had that recorded an album called Dream of the Elders. And he and I played together on a record date that we did for Tony Reedus, the drummer. Tony introduced us as players. Although I knew Steve, we hadn't played together before that moment.

I met Billy Kilson around '87 when I took a trip up to Boston to play some of my big band music with a local big band. Billy was in that. So, we've known each other since then, also.

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