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Chris Potter: Way Above Ground with Underground

R.J. DeLuke By

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CHRIS POTTERSaxophonist Chris Potter, at age 38, has long been fast-tracked to the head of his class to become regarded as one of the strongest players on the scene. It doesn't seem that long ago that he was first making waves on recordings, and then became part of the superb Dave Holland quintet, where his strengths were put on display all over the globe.



Fact is, Potter has earned his stripes every step of the way. He's made his bones with some of the greats in the art form, all along the way developing his thing. It can be heard in his recordings over time. Growth. Maturity. Strength. It's evident, and other musicians are aware of it. That's why his phone is always ringing. That's why, for example, at the jazz festival in Newport, R.I., last summer he jumped from playing with Holland's band to his own band's gig, to adding fire and punch to Herbie Hancock's set of music. No matter what setting, Potter brings something substantive to the table.



That's not bound to stop. Not because of his age and how much he has before him. Some musicians don't advance much further beyond initial success. Potter possesses the attitude of many of his influences, like Holland. The spirit of adventure; the desire to take on challenges.



"I can imagine a lot of different situations I'd like to get myself into in the future," he says with a hint of glee from his New York City home in June.



He made that statement in the midst of his latest undertaking, the further development of his band, Underground, started a few years back. The group plays funky, contemporary, highly creative music on its latest recording, Ultrahang, an ArtistShare project.



Ultrahang is a top-notch mix of funk and modern rhythms, and splendidly crafted themes, over which these creative musicians—Potter, guitarist Adam Rogers, keyboardist Craig Taborn, and drummer Nate Smith—weave compelling tales. It's contemporary and hip without making any concessions. Potter doesn't seem capable of compromising in order to sound "today."



Its one of the damn finer recordings so far this year.



"When I started the group, and even now, when I'm thinking of what to write or perform as a group, I think the first duty that we have is to do something that turns us on. That's how it came about," he says of the current path Underground is on. "I was thinking, 'What would I like to hear? What kind of a setting would I enjoy exploring?' So I set up this situation where I really didn't know what the rules would be ahead of time. I had some ideas that I wanted it to be more funk related and the instrumentation being that particular kind of sound. But I wasn't thinking of accessibility as a main focal point at all."



He adds, "I will say that the idea was in my head that this music needs to be connected to the culture. That was always its big strength: It's relationship to the larger culture. It wasn't off on an island all by itself. In the golden era [of jazz], when Duke Ellington was extremely popular, it was very artistically ambitious music, but it wasn't designed to be in some ivory tower. I was trying to approach it from that angle. What's out there in the musical culture at large that feels vital to me? You want to make something that feels vital."

Most of the music is original, save for Bob Dylan's "It Ain't Me Babe," and Joni Mitchell's "Ladies of the Canyon." "Facing East" has a simple, children's song-like beginning, creating a "where's it going?" feel, but soon gets heavy with Smith's drums. Rogers solos with an economy of notes, but making them count in a bluesy manner. Potter plays some bass clarinet in addition to his usual tenor sax, and on the former he shows agility and emotion, the low register allowing him to explore the bottom, which he does in fast and funky fashion.



The music makes you tap your feet while these remarkable musicians express themselves over that funk/soul tapestry. On "Rumples," Rogers' solo is fleet, straddling bop and blues. Potter's muscular sax attack climbs over every inch of the theme. Dylan's song is used as a ballad; Potter chooses the bass clarinet on which to cry out the theme. Taborn's keyboard solo is pensive and strong. It builds until Potter preaches on tenor, soulful and gutsy. Great sound and feeling.



"The instrumentation is unusual," he says. "The fact that it is the Rhodes piano and electric guitar. It has a certain sound with electricity involved. The music is more based in funk that most of the music I've done in the past, on my own. It's more of a difference in texture, I think. I guess there is a difference in content, too. It's kind of an experiment in trying to break through to something new, using whatever methods we can think of to do it."



Each tune is strong and the recording bears repeated listening. One doesn't miss the bass, but looking back there's realization of the accomplishment of getting that kind of funky feel without one.


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