Support All About Jazz

All About Jazz needs your help and we have a deal. Pay $20 and we'll hide those six pesky Google ads that appear on every page, plus this box and the slideout box on the right for a full year! You'll also fund website expansion.


I want to help
123

The Gibson Brothers: Bona Fide

C. Michael Bailey By

Sign in to view read count Views
The Gibson Brothers: Bona Fide The Gibson Brothers are not Nickel Creek. Their music is not cutting edge, andit need not be. Leigh and Eric Gibson are keepers of the flame, playing a traditional brand of bluegrass very well. Both are able singers capable of effecting the "high lonesome" tenor pioneered by Big Mon.

Their songs here, all original save for a single Tom T. Hall cover, are red-hot bluegrass pieces with rippling banjos and mandolins. The brothers lyrics deal with the characteristic themes of bluegrass: love, poverty, death, and music. Their harmonies, vocal and instrumental are as infectious as the flu while being a lot more fun to suffer from. "The Open Road" provides the disc's title and sets up a groove, painting the song as a road trip. "Ragged Man" and "Don’t Forget the Coffee, Billy Joe" are tomes of everyday life on the margins, while "Railroad Line" talks a good line but smells like desperation. This is a fabulous addition to the Sugar Hill and bluegrass catalog.



For more information, please see Sugar Hill Records and The Gibson Brothers .


Track Listing: The Open Road; Arleigh; Ragged Man; Railroad Line; That Bluegrass Music; Vern

Personnel: Leigh Gibson

Year Released: 2003 | Record Label: Sugar Hill Records | Style: Beyond Jazz


CD/LP/Track Review
Read more articles
Bona Fide
Bona Fide
Sugar Hill Records
2003
buy

More Articles

Post a comment

comments powered by Disqus

Join the staff. Writers Wanted!

Develop a column, write album reviews, cover live shows, or conduct interviews.