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Bokani Dyer: African Piano

Seton Hawkins By

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I think a lot of my music touches on identity, which is a personal thing, but I think it also echoes in the societal issues of the time that we're dealing with, especially in this part of the world. —Bokani Dyer
Throughout this decade, pianist, composer, and bandleader Bokani Dyer has stood as one of the most formidable and creative keyboard talents in South Africa today. Raised in a musical family—his father is the legendary saxophonist Steve Dyer—Bokani Dyer quickly demonstrated an extraordinary musical vision and identity of his own. Indeed, albums of his, notably Emancipate the Story and World Music, stand as modern classics highlighting the breathtaking creativity in South Africa's music scene today.

As Dyer releases his fourth album, entitled Neo Native, the music finds him in a pared-down setting, highlighting the gorgeous interplay of his working trio, exploring the complex question of identity in South Africa, and delving even more deeply into a keyboard concept he has dubbed "African Piano."

All About Jazz: You're born in Botswana, and born into a musical family. Can you talk about your earliest memories?

Bokani Dyer: My father [saxophonist and composer Steve Dyer] is a musician, and he was part of a community of artists who were forced into exile into neighboring countries. He was a part of a group who were based in Gaborone [capital of Botswana] at the time that I was born. A lot of things were happening; I don't have a conscious recollection of that time, but that was environment surrounding me when I was born.

I would say that my earliest memories were travelling with my dad when he was on tour. He was running a band called Southern Freeway, which he recorded in about 1989. I remember meeting the musicians, hanging out and checking out the rehearsals and soundchecks. Those would be my earliest musical memories.

AAJ: Your dad's music finds him jumping across genres and styles with tremendous facility. It's something that seems to be present in your music too, an ability to synthesize many styles and sounds.

BD: I guess because of the exposure to it, you almost cannot control what goes in! But I agree that his music has been informed by many influences.

AAJ: You have major watersheds in your career as we enter the 2010s. However, can you talk about your time prior to that, specifically your time studying at the University of Cape Town?

BD: UCT was great. When I got ready to study, I was first thinking of going to the States. I was getting into Jazz, and thought it'd be great to study at Berklee, so that was my first choice when I thought about studying music. But that was not to be. My dad had played with many musicians in the scene, and he felt the University of Cape Town was the best school at the time. My first year was 2004, and it was a great experience. I studied with Mike Campbell, who was the head of the department, and my piano teacher was Andrew Lilley.

The most important thing about studying there, in hindsight, was being with other young musicians. That was the most profound thing about it, finding people and working together. It's important to have these contemporaries who are speaking the same language, in the same phase of life. These are also people who grew up in similar circumstances. We had a lot of the same influences growing up in Southern Africa. The connections formed then still continue in my musical relationships today.

AAJ: Yes, in fact while your album Neo Native came out this year, in the past year we also hear you playing beautifully on albums by artists like Shane Cooper, Benjamin Jephta, and Sisonke Xonti. Can you talk more about the community of artists?

BD: I think it's a very special time at the moment. There is an awareness of this energy, and it's a beautiful thing. It can only make things greater, and a lot of young musicians are creating really amazing work. It feels fresh, and I'm very proud to be a part of that group. I think the world at large is starting to open up with interest to what's going on in South Africa right now.

AAJ: In terms of your being a part of that movement, let's look at some of your records. Your debut record Mirrors came out in 2010. Can you talk about that album's conception and how you approached it?

BD: I wasn't approaching anything! I had some compositions, and I needed to find a way to get them down. I had no basis from which to work. I had tried with my trio, and we had recorded some things, but I wasn't happy with the tracks, and so I added some horns on top of the tunes. There were a few separate recording sessions to make up that album, so it was recorded between 2008 and 2010, different sessions with different musicians. There are some trio tracks, some quintet stuff, and some separate sessions with bigger bands. Basically, that was my first statement, and I just wanted to put my best foot forward, my favorite pieces.

AAJ : The piece "Song No. 2" from that album includes moments that remind one of Bheki Mseleku, while your keyboard playing on that track has the same singing touch as someone like Moses Taiwa Molelekwa. Were they influences of yours?

BD: Definitely, they were inspirations to me. I was listening to a lot of Bheki Mseleku at the time, but I think that the nature of the influence is not always apparent when I listen to my music. I don't necessarily hear a direct influence of Bheki's, but he has been a huge inspiration, musically and otherwise.

In fact, the track "Whisper" was a dedication to Bheki. How it came about was that Charlie Haden was playing at the Cape Town International Jazz Festival, and he gave a workshop that I attended. He had previously recorded the album Star Seeding with Bheki Mseleku, and he was talking about this thing that all great players had, which is a whisper. You can hear the notes being played, but along with that there's another frequency you can hear at the same time. The way I took it was a spiritual frequency that goes along with the music. So that was a track dedicated to Bheki.

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Neo Native

Neo Native

Self Produced
2018

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World Music

World Music

Self Produced
2016

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