All About Jazz

Home » Articles » Interviews

6

Bob James: Piano Player

R.J. DeLuke By

Sign in to view read count
It vaulted his career as an important player, writer and arranger with Grammys for One on One with Klugh and Double Vision with Sanborn. So many highlights. Among them was a four and a half year tenure with the legendary Sarah Vaughan.

" It was great. I often refer to that time as my second college education. She was such a phenomenal musician in addition to being a brilliant jazz singer," James says. "She also played piano very well. So she could sit down at the piano bench and show me what I was doing wrong and humble me at any point whenever I wasn't doing what she needed. That in itself was an education.

"She was also very moody. I could feel the difference in the way she would sing when the trio was inspiring her or when we, for whatever reason, weren't in the groove or our tempos weren't quite right. I could hear the level of her performance go down when we weren't giving her what she deserved, what she needed. That was great motivation to get better. I could feel it for those four years—how great she sounded when we really had the groove happening. It was fun and very inspiring."

The years with Creed Taylor's CTI label also came with a boost from Quincy Jones. He invited James to play on his album Walking in Space and to write a couple arrangements. "The fact that Quincy wanted to hire me as part of the all-star band that was playing with him at the time, gave Creed Taylor the interest to hire me again. I started getting calls from Creed Taylor to play on various albums of his and eventually I got called in to be an arranger. For the next three or four years, before I got a solo contract with him, I was arranging for Stanley Turrentine and Grover Washington Jr. and Hank Crawford. A whole group of artists that I got a chance to meet first hand and be in this famous studio of Rudy Van Gelder's. Suddenly I was surrounded by people like Billy Cobham and Jack DeJohnette and Ron Carter and George Benson. I never knew from one week to the next who it was going to be, but I had the chance to find out whether I could hold my own."

James work on Taxi was unexpected. It was the result of the production group being fans of his work—not James seeking it out or getting recommended. He had career in the recording scene in New York doing radio and TV commercials but didn't enjoy it, though it paid some of the bills. Jazz projects interested him more. Along the way, his fourth CTI album called BJ4 ended up in the record collection of one of the producers of the Taxi TV series.

James says the producers "were scurrying around trying to decide what kind of music they wanted to have, they started playing my recording. They liked the feel of it. They liked the sound of it. So they contacted me. I wasn't pursuing a career in TV or film music at all at that time. I was quite happy with the direction I was going, spending lots of time at Rudy Van Gelder's studio and doing various projects for Creed Taylor. But this seemed intriguing to me primarily because they weren't asking me to change my sound or my style.

"They liked the recording and asked me if I was interested in creating some more music in the same vein. They gave me a budget to go into the studio and do a mock up, almost like an album project, but exploring, coming up with a sound that would fit this TV series. In my mind, I was thinking New York City cab drivers, a kind of frenetic, high-energy type of music. I submitted a piece to them thinking in terms of what I thought would be a good theme for the series. But when they heard another one of the pieces I had prepared, more like a background cue, they liked it a lot more. It turned out to be 'Angela' (watch live version) and they asked me if they could use it for the main theme instead. I said, OK. I had no idea it would turn out to be as successful as it was."

"I was helped in a very large part by the fact that the series was such a big hit and was syndicated all around the world. My theme got heard thousands of times more than it would have if I had just stayed within the jazz community. It became, for better or for worse, my signature piece. People still ask me about it all these years later."

It doesn't bother James to re-visit it show after show. "The nicest part about it is it's not a crazy novelty piece, it's not a disco piece or something I would feel dated about. It's mellow. It's got a simple, but nice set of changes to improvise on. I don't get tired of playing it. I feel really lucky that I have something like that, that I can count on at the end of my show to make my audience comfortable and happy."

Another source of pride for James is Fourplay.

Tags

Related Video

comments powered by Disqus

Shop Music & Tickets

Click any of the store links below and you'll support All About Jazz in the process. Learn how.

CD/LP/Track Review
Interviews
Live Reviews
CD/LP/Track Review
Read more articles
Espresso

Espresso

Evosound
2018

buy
Expresso

Expresso

Evosound
2018

buy
Altair & Vega

Altair & Vega

E OneEntertainment
2012

buy
Explosions

Explosions

ESP Disk
2009

buy

Related Articles

Read Jay Thomas: We Always Knew Interviews
Jay Thomas: We Always Knew
by Paul Rauch
Published: November 16, 2018
Read Meet Roy Hargrove Interviews
Meet Roy Hargrove
by Mark Felton
Published: November 5, 2018
Read Maria Schneider: On the Road Again Interviews
Maria Schneider: On the Road Again
by Mark Robbins
Published: October 14, 2018
Read Alan Broadbent: Intimate Reflections on a Passion for Jazz Interviews
Alan Broadbent: Intimate Reflections on a Passion for Jazz
by Victor L. Schermer
Published: October 12, 2018
Read Stefon Harris: Pursuing the Tradition Interviews
Stefon Harris: Pursuing the Tradition
by R.J. DeLuke
Published: October 5, 2018
Read Randy Weston: The Spirit of Our Ancestors Interviews
Randy Weston: The Spirit of Our Ancestors
by Ludovico Granvassu
Published: September 7, 2018
Read "Meet Roy Hargrove" Interviews Meet Roy Hargrove
by Mark Felton
Published: November 5, 2018
Read "Nels and Alex Cline: 50 Years in the Making" Interviews Nels and Alex Cline: 50 Years in the Making
by Jonathan Manning
Published: January 25, 2018
Read "Dafnis Prieto: Cross-Cultural Mix" Interviews Dafnis Prieto: Cross-Cultural Mix
by Angelo Leonardi
Published: March 13, 2018
Read "Maria Schneider: On the Road Again" Interviews Maria Schneider: On the Road Again
by Mark Robbins
Published: October 14, 2018
Read "Stefon Harris: Pursuing the Tradition" Interviews Stefon Harris: Pursuing the Tradition
by R.J. DeLuke
Published: October 5, 2018
Read "Django Bates: Generous Abundance" Interviews Django Bates: Generous Abundance
by Ludovico Granvassu
Published: June 22, 2018