Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

6

Atlanta Jazz Festival 2018

Mark Sullivan By

Sign in to view read count
The Linda May Han Oh Quintet was the closing show on the Next Gen Stage, and was easily the most experimental music I heard during the festival. The leader played double bass for the first half of the set, producing a sound much bigger than her diminutive stature would suggest. "Yoda" was a rhythmic tune with a clear cyclical structure: very satisfying to hear the turnaround return during the solos. Oh played an unaccompanied bass solo to lead into the next tune, "Lucid Lullaby" (she back-announced the titles later). Or possibly it was "Firedancer," the third tune played in the first part of the set. It was built on a bass ostinato, and all of the other instruments took turns commenting. In addition to announcing the song titles, Oh introduced her band: pianist Fabian Almazan; guitarist Matthew Stevens; drummer Rudy Royston; and alto saxophonist Greg Ward. Switching to electric bass for the rest of the set, she described "Speech Impediment" as someone's halting attempt to tell his beloved that he loves her. It began with a dense unaccompanied piano introduction (Oh said the piece featured Almazon and Royston). Oh played a repeated riff which she doubled with vocalise, while guitar and saxophone played a loosely doubled line. Royston's turn to shine came with an extended unaccompanied drum solo: beginning with soft mallets, he built up to drumsticks, finally adding snare drum only at the climax. The following tune had an especially jerky rhythm, and featured pairs of solos: first electric bass alternating with saxophone, then guitar alternating with piano. Almazan occasionally used a bit of electronic processing on the piano, which was especially noticeable here. A nursery rhyme-like line was repeated by the whole band to end. "Western" closed the set. Stevens took an especially exciting guitar solo, full of fast, skittering chromatic lines. The piece runs down like a clock before returning to the theme. Linda has been prominent as a side person, currently with guitarist Pat Metheny. This show demonstrated equal facility as a composer and band leader.

May 27, 2018

Antoine Roney Trio featuring Kojo Roney/The Russell Malone Quartet/M.F. Production's Latin Jazz All Stars/The Bad Plus

Saxophonist Antoine Roney is not as well known as his brother, trumpeter Wallace Roney, but he has worked with many "name" players and recorded several albums as a leader. He immediately proved himself as an exciting (and technically assured) tenor saxophonist with the fast opening bebop tune at the Next Gen stage. It recalled Sonny Rollins to me, but part of that may just be the trio format of saxophone, double bass and drums that Rollins sometimes favored. He switched to soprano saxophone for the second tune, a modal one based on a double bass ostinato, similar to several John Coltrane pieces. Taking up the tenor again, he slowed things down with a slow blues, followed by another fast jazz standard that featured bass and drums at the end. Drummer Kojo Odu Roney is Antoine's son, and something of a prodigy. He was playing drums in his uncle Wallace's band at age thirteen, and is an impressive player, swinging and creative. It was a pleasure hearing real bebop from this trio, but unfortunately I had to dash before the end of the set. So I don't know if Roney announced the titles, or the name of his bassist!

Tags

Watch

comments powered by Disqus

Wolf Out

Wolf Out

The Bad Plus
Made Possible

Live Reviews
Album Reviews
Live Reviews
Album Reviews
Extended Analysis
Live Reviews
Album Reviews
Extended Analysis
Album Reviews
Live Reviews
Album Reviews
Multiple Reviews
Opinion
Album Reviews
  • Give by Simon Calle
Read more articles
Never Stop II

Never Stop II

Legbreaker Records
2018

buy
It's Hard

It's Hard

Okeh
2017

buy
The Bad Plus Joshua Redman

The Bad Plus Joshua...

Nonesuch Records
2015

buy
The Bad Plus: The Rite Of Spring

The Bad Plus: The...

Sony Masterworks
2014

buy
The Rite of Spring

The Rite of Spring

Sony Masterworks
2014

buy
Never Stop

Never Stop

E1 Music
2012

buy

Upcoming Shows

Date Detail Price
Jan24Thu
The Bad Plus
August Wilson Center
Pittsburgh, PA
Jan25Fri
The Bad Plus
Jazz Kitchen
Indianapolis, IN
$25
Jan25Fri
The Bad Plus
Jazz Kitchen
Indianapolis, IN
$25
Jan25Fri
The Bad Plus
The Jazz Kitchen
Indianapolis, IN
Feb9Sat
The Bad Plus
Kimmel Center - Perelman Theater
Philadelphia, PA
Feb12Tue
The Bad Plus
Musical Instrument Museum
Phoenix, AZ
Feb13Wed
The Bad Plus
Athenaeum Music & Arts Library
La Jolla, CA

Shop

Start your shopping here and you'll support All About Jazz in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Live Reviews
The Philly Pops Big Band with Terell Stafford and Guests at the Kimmel Center
By Victor L. Schermer
January 24, 2019
Live Reviews
Kevin Bales With Chuck Redd At The Jazz Corner
By Martin McFie
January 21, 2019
Live Reviews
Darrell Grant Black Art @ 25 Quartet at Birdland Theater
By Mike Jurkovic
January 18, 2019
Live Reviews
Odean Pope Quartet at the Philadelphia Museum of Art
By Victor L. Schermer
January 15, 2019
Live Reviews
Denise Donatelli at Mezzrow
By Nicholas F. Mondello
January 10, 2019