Articles by Eric Gudas

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Multiple Reviews

William Parker: Mayan Space Station & Painters Winter

Read "William Parker: Mayan Space Station & Painters Winter" reviewed by Eric Gudas


"Ungentrified funk": that's how William Parker characterized the music of his Mayan Space Station ensemble after a Zoom-transmitted performance— plus Q&A session— in the summer of 2020. Like Duke Ellington and Cecil Taylor—the latter whose group he played with in the 1980s—the protean Parker has become a genre unto himself. Parker's brand of funk has deep musical and cultural roots in the 1970s loft jazz scene, which thrived in the (then) as-yet-ungentrified neighborhoods of Soho and the Lower East Side. ...

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Interview

The Unstoppable James Brandon Lewis

Read "The Unstoppable James Brandon Lewis" reviewed by Eric Gudas


Tenor saxophonist, composer, and writer James Brandon Lewis is driven by a restlessness that makes him one of his generation's standout players of, and thinkers about jazz. Although he was voted Rising Star Tenor Saxophonist in the 2020 DownBeat Magazine International Critic's Poll, most might say, after listening to his recent releases, that his star has already risen. Hailing from Buffalo, New York, Lewis apprenticed at Howard University, CalArts, the Banff International Workshop in Jazz and Creative Music, ...

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Album Review

Charles Lloyd: Tone Poem

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Charles Lloyd and The Marvels' April 2017 performance at UCLA's Royce Hall, with guest vocalist Lucinda Williams, was nothing but highlights--from Lloyd's dance moves across the stage as one or other of his bandmates soloed, to Williams' impassioned performances on such songs as Bob Dylan's “Masters of War" and Jimi Hendrix's “Angel." They also played a song by Beach Boys. ("In My Room"). But the night really got going when the band played about fifteen minutes of Ornette Coleman material, ...

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Interview

Emma Swift's Multitudes

Read "Emma Swift's Multitudes" reviewed by Eric Gudas


As its title suggests, Blonde on the Tracks, Australian-born, Nashville-based singer-songwriter Emma Swift's first full-length album, re-interprets songs from the heart of Bob Dylan 1960s and '70s catalog, although its span covers his most recent work. Swift belongs to the generations of listeners who grew up on the songs of Gram Parsons}], Dylan, {{m: Joni Mitchell, Neil Young, Bill Withers, Leonard Cohen, and other masters of 1960s and '70s-era Great North American Songbook, much as Dylan and his contemporaries were ...

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Extended Analysis

Trout Mask Replica

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“No Instruction Sheet": Trout Mask Replica's Unfathomable Origin Story If you were a teenager who liked freaky stuff, on a June day in 1969 you could bicycle down to your local record store and buy a brand-new, shrink-wrapped album with a man covering his entire face with an actual fish head on the cover. A double-LP set, it cost your whole month's paper route money, but there was something about the guys on the back-cover photo, who looked like refugees ...

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Album Review

Bob Dylan: More Blood, More Tracks: The Bootleg Series Vol. 14

Read "More Blood, More Tracks: The Bootleg Series Vol. 14" reviewed by Eric Gudas


The challenge of finding something original to say about Bob Dylan's Blood on the Tracks (1975), the mother of all comeback albums, baffles even the most steely-eyed critic. But Sony has made the task easier with More Blood, More Tracks, the unfortunately titled, overpriced, but nonetheless revelatory fourteenth entry in the Bootleg Series. The six-disc Deluxe Edition contains all extant tracks for the album, recorded in 1974 over four September days in New York and two late December days in ...


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