Articles

Daily articles including interviews, profiles, live reviews, film reviews and more... all carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. You can find more articles by searching our website, see what's trending on our popular articles page or read articles ahead of their published dates on our future articles page.

14

Album Review

Ian Carr: Solar Session

Read "Solar Session" reviewed by Chris May


One of the first European jazz bandleaders to embrace synthesizers, bass guitars and other electric instruments, trumpeter, composer and author Ian Carr forged a singularly British style of jazz-rock with his band Nucleus, which he formed in 1969 and with which he recorded a dozen albums through the 1970s. Carr had previously paid extensive dues in acoustic jazz, most notably as co-leader with saxophonist Don Rendell of the highly regarded, culturally inclusive Rendell-Carr Quintet from 1964 to 1969.

4

Album Review

Ian Carr: Torrid Zone - The Vertigo Recordings 1970-1975

Read "Torrid Zone - The Vertigo Recordings 1970-1975" reviewed by Roger Farbey


Cherry Red Records and its subsidiary labels excel in reissues; especially so with their occasional jazz-related box sets. Memorable examples include the 6-CD Jack Bruce collection, Can You Follow?, (Esoteric Recordings, 2008), Turtle Records--Pioneering British Jazz 1970-1971 (RPM, 2015) and most recently Gordon Beck—Jubilation! (Turtle Records, 2018). Now they've done it again with a painstakingly assembled reissue of the first six albums by trumpeter/composer Ian Carr and Nucleus, reflecting their Vertigo Records tenure. In common with other box sets, this ...

29

Rediscovery

Ian Carr: Belladonna

Read "Ian Carr: Belladonna" reviewed by John Kelman


Ian Carr Belladonna Vertigo 1972 Today's Rediscovery? British trumpeter Ian Carr's Belladonna, a gem of an album that's also the coming out party for soon-to-be-legendary guitarist Allan Holdsworth. A album I'd not heard in the decade since I wrote the retrospective Ian Carr And Nucleus: '70s British Jazz Rock Progenitors for All About Jazz in the fall of 2004, listening to it again after all these years brought back all the reasons why ...

252

Album Review

Nucleus: UK Tour '76

Read "UK Tour '76" reviewed by John Kelman


If British jazz/rock progenitor Ian Carr and his Nucleus group had made any kind of splash in the US with early albums like Elastic Rock (Vertigo, 1970), they had become largely forgotten by the mid-1970s. That's unfortunate, because they continued to record and tour in the UK and Europe and, with the exit of keyboardist/reedman/composer Karl Jenkins, became a significantly stronger vehicle for Carr's identity.

Later albums like Alleycat (Vertigo, 1975) lacked the panache of the earlier classics, but a ...

240

Album Review

Nucleus: Hemispheres

Read "Hemispheres" reviewed by John Kelman


While general interest in Soft Machine continued long after the seminal British jazz/rock group disbanded, the spotlight on trumpeter Ian Carr's Nucleus seemed to go dark following the band's breakup in the early 1980s. With the reissues of the group's back catalogue that have come out in recent years, that spotlight is back on, reminding listeners that Nucleus was just as seminal a jazz/rock outfit. Hemispheres is the first archival live release to feature the original lineup from Nucleus' first ...

451

Profile

Ian Carr: The Maestro and His Music

Read "Ian Carr: The Maestro and His Music" reviewed by Roger Farbey


Ian Carr has been at the forefront of British modern jazz for over 40 years. He started playing trumpet in his brother Mike's band, the EmCee 5 in the very early 1960s. This bebop-influenced band even boasted a young John McLaughlin in its lineup at one point. He moved down to London from his home turf of the North East of England and then met up with various jazz musicians, including saxophonist Don Rendell. He teamed up with Don and ...

1,348

Profile

Ian Carr and Nucleus: '70s British Jazz Rock Progenitors

Read "Ian Carr and Nucleus: '70s British Jazz Rock Progenitors" reviewed by John Kelman


Ask the question, “who was the first fusion artist?" and you're likely to start a heated debate. While populists like to claim Miles Davis and seminal recordings including In a Silent Way and especially Bitches Brew as the first salvos in a genre that ultimately spawned groups including Chick Corea's Return to Forever, Wayne Shorter, Joe Zawinul and Miroslav Vitous' initially more freely-conceived Weather Report and, of course, the incendiary Mahavishnu Orchestra, fronted by guitar legend John McLaughlin, the reality ...


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