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2015 Detroit Jazz Festival

C. Andrew Hovan By

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Detroit Jazz Festival
Hart Plaza
Detroit, Michigan
September 4-7, 2015

As the world's largest free jazz festival, Detroit's annual Labor Day offering provides a rewarding, but daunting task for anyone set to hunker down in the Motor City all Labor Day weekend. This year about 60 performances were in the offing spread over four stages during the course of the four-day event. It is obviously just not possible to experience it all. The sooner one wraps their head around that concept the better time they will have in accepting the consequences of such. This should serve as a caveat in understanding that the following is a reflection on the choices made by this reviewer and that complete coverage of a festival of this type is not logistically possible.

Let it be said that under the guidance of previous musical directors Frank Malfitano and Terri Pontremoli, there were even harder choices to make between more performances and overlapping sets. In his fourth year as current director, Chris Collins has done a better job at allowing for breathing space between sets. The problem now is that he has performances from similar genres sharing similar times on different stages. Malfitano and Pontremoli avoided this by mixing the styles among the stages, making those choices easier to make. Collins has a decidedly mainstream approach to his programming that does not allow for such a strategy.

It was interesting to notice all the different ways folks utilized in keeping their agendas clear, from highlighters to spreadsheets. How does one decide between Eddie Daniels and the Detroit Festival Orchestra on one stage and the Liberation Music Orchestra conducted by Carla Bley on another? Or, would you rather see Oliver Lake's quartet or the pairing of John Scofield and Joe Lovano? And what happens, as it did several times, when delays throw off the schedule of a given stage entirely? Who likes to make these kind of choices?

Now add to all of this the sheer logistics of getting from one stage to the other. Even with the soaring temperatures and full sun, Hart Plaza was packed each day, no doubt fostered by the wide appeal of festival artist-in-residence Pat Metheny. The guitarist's modus operandi was to play in a different setting on each of the four stages over the course of the weekend. Sounds like a great idea, but the duo set he shared with bassist Ron Carter housed at the space-constrained Pyramid Stage was a fire hazard in the making. People started camping out for a spot early on Sunday morning, so by the time of the pair's 5:15 set, the venue was crammed beyond capacity.

A further learning curve ensued with the first-time use of a wristband system for attendance at the after-hours jam sessions. Housed in the Volt Lounge at the Marriot Renaissance Center, the crowds are always healthy and the need for a change was understandable. Inexplicably, few knew about this system ahead of time and the 250 wristbands were dulled out each evening around 6:30, a time when most folks were somewhere on Hart Plaza taking in the festival performances.

Following a stodgy and pretentious salute to Benny Goodwin featuring Gordon Goodwin's Big Phat Band and a quartet of clarinet virtuosos, Friday's opening festivities really heated up with the first appearance of Metheny in a trio with bassist Scott Colley and drummer Antonio Sanchez. The unit brought new life to Metheny staples like "James" and "Lone Jack," the guitarist letting loose a barrage of Ornetteish runs on the former as he engaged in dialogue with Sanchez.

The crowd certainly understood the gravity of the moment when Detroit legend Kenny Garrett stepped on stage, the pair not having played together for some 20 years. Garrett's "Sing a Song of Songs" brought swells of applause as he and Metheny hunkered down for a true meeting of the minds. Even with a difference in styles and tastes, the pair met each other on an equal playing field that led to some especially incendiary exchanges. A rapturous "Are You Going With Me" provided the closing gambit on a particularly choice pairing of giants.

Saturday the area around the Waterfront Stage filled up quickly and the sun was baking, yet cooler minds prevailed via a tribute to the music of Brazil as offered by Anat Cohen and her quartet. While the spirit of Brazil was to be found in the frameworks of the pieces, the sound was pure Cohen. Aided by the vamp-heavy grooves of bassist Linda May Han Oh and the colorful drumming of Daniel Freedman, Cohen's filigreed clarinet lines revealed a refined insight that went beyond merely grafting her Jewish sensibilities to the samba.

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