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2008 Copenhagen Jazz Festival

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2008 Copenhagen Jazz Festival
Copenhagen, Denmark
July 4th-13th, 2008
Celebrating its 30th anniversary, the Copenhagen Jazz Festival is a model of excellence for jazz festivals worldwide. From July 4th-13th, the Danish capital was the scene of 900+ music events at over 100 venues, from countless outdoor concerts in public squares, parks and along the waterfront to a vast array of bars, clubs and concert halls across the city. And though quantity doesn't always necessarily mean quality, Scandinavia—and particularly Denmark—has some of the strongest jazz musicians in the world today, a fact the festival exploited in addition to spotlighting a countless number of musicians from countries close by like Sweden, Finland and Norway.

Copenhagen, like New York, is a very easy city to navigate and come jazz festival season it's particularly advantageous to join the locals on pedals. Bicycles seem to be the preferred mode of transportation especially if one is to take full advantage of the festival. Being able to catch over seven sets of jazz music each day is a phenomena typically associated with New York City, and downtown Copenhagen is eerily West Village-like during Festival season with clubs like La Fontaine, Huset (with its Knitting Factory- like layout of multiple performance spaces under the same roof) and ten other venues in such close proximity to one another.

A particularly strong showing of young Danish pianists appeared with frequency this year including Jacob Anderskov (who played in almost 20 different contexts, over half of them as leader), Simon Toldam and Soren Kjaergaard. All three performed at the Trinitatis Kirkeplads free outdoors afternoon solo piano series, and though each brought their distinct and dynamic approaches to their respective performances which may have been better suited to a concert hall setting, the music translated surprisingly well in the long rectangular outside space. Kjaergaard (who only had previously done two or three prior solo concerts) played primarily in stream of consciousness mode, connecting themes and becoming more introspective than demonstrative as his set progressed, playing Randy Weston-like left-hand bass rumblings.

Without relying on the predominant African rhythmic bass figures, he rather used them as a springboard into his extended performance that became soothing, beautiful, hypnotic, meditative, flowing, transporting and demanding as much on musician as listener. The 40+ minute first portion of the set came off as complex intimate piano exercises as if he had invited the audience into his living room. For his second near 10-minute piece, he played more staccato in comparison, his humming lending an emotional and extra musical weight, subtle enough without becoming a distraction. His closing improvisation turned into one of the most memorable of this year's festival as he suddenly was accompanied by and battled with the minutes-long 5 o'clock church tower bells just above him, which he turned the tables on at a point by accompanying the bells' tones! Without pause it was seemingly Kjaergaard who instigated the interaction, as if he knew exactly what time it was seconds before the clock struck five.

The loud resonating chimes of the church bell became a living, breathing musician and of course the timekeeper of the two. It was a fabulous musical discussion and added a nice interactive element from the otherwise solid solo set. And as Kjaergaard was running off to two more gigs that evening (typical), he humored to me—"(I was) saved by the bell!"



Kjaergaard also played as a member of saxophonist Michael Blake's Blake Tartare, a Danish group excepting its saxophone-playing Canadian-born leader and longtime New York resident. Along with the ever-busy bassist and drummer, Jonas Westergaard and Kresten Osgood, Blake Tartare for its first of two sets at the outdoor Frue Plads also invited Kasper Tranberg (trumpet), Peter Fulsang (clarinet/bass clarinet), and two string players: Kristian Jorgensen (violin) and Henrik Dam Thomsen (cello).

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