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Vandermark 5 and Atomic: Double Bill at the Vortex in London

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Vandermark 5 and Atomic
The Vortex
London
September 16, 2010

It was difficult to avoid a frisson of pleasurable anticipation at the sight of the handwritten sign proclaiming "Totally sold out" taped onto the door of north London's Vortex Jazz Club. A feeling compounded by the presence of the BBC's mobile recording unit parked outside. This was going to be a good night. And why shouldn't it be with a double header by the Vandermark 5 and Atomic, two of the hottest working units in contemporary jazz, newly arrived in the UK for the last leg of an 11-date European tour. Leader Ken Vandermark
Ken Vandermark
Ken Vandermark
b.1964
saxophone
's Facebook fan page with his characteristically unflinching self analysis in a blow by blow account of the tour suggested that something special was in the offing.

After the introduction from Jez Nelson of the BBC, the Vandermark 5 blasted out of the gate with the familiar refrain of "Friction" from Beat Reader (Atavistic, 2008). As a statement of intent it was unmistakable: they meant business. And the leader's fiery tenor saxophone in duet with Timothy Daisy
Timothy Daisy
Timothy Daisy
b.1976
drums
's whipcrack drums showed how. As the reedman's shrieks and ascending screaming phrases dropped away, the drummer carried on alone in a display of astonishing speed and articulation, before a concluding crash signaled the rest of the band's re-entry. It was a great opener, full of energy and excitement; paradoxically tightly arranged but executed with loose panache. Vandermark's wry self deprecating sense of humor manifest itself in his introductions. If he ever needed a break he should pursue a second career as a standup comic.

Thereafter came three new compositions, workshopped during a Chicago residency in August, and now being road-tested prior to eventual commitment to disc. "Fables Of Facts" boasted a wonderfully woozy riff shared by the twin saxophones which launched a typically fluent and serpentine exploration by Dave Rempis
Dave Rempis
Dave Rempis

saxophone
on tenor, with supportive riffing from Vandermark. Subsequent switches posed a series of improv events by subsets of the band. Though they were only five strong, the range of sounds achieved through Rempis and Vandermark's doubling, Fred Lonberg-Holm
Fred Lonberg-Holm
Fred Lonberg-Holm
b.1962
cello
's cello frontline/rhythm section ambivalence and Daisy's timbral nous, belied numerical limits. Standout passages included a duet of cello and drums where Lonberg-Holm's litany of emphatic scrapes, wiggling bow underneath the strings and on the body of the cello was matched by Daisy's percussive spread extracted from gongs on drum heads and deftly attenuated cymbal work. Cathartic ensemble interplay atop a funky cello riff segued into dual aerobatics from the twin horns, until they casually veered into a final repeated unison.

As Vandermark remarked, their pieces this evening were longer than they were short, but they were packing a lot into them. "Location" and "Leap Revisited" continue the penchant for rapid change written into the fabric of the charts. Cued by the leader's striking whole body movement, the former concluded with Rempis blowing hard on tenor contrasted against a shifting soundscape of electronics from Lonberg-Holm, until an unexpected halt. While the latter began as a showcase for the cellist's virtuosity: his searing bowing rode a roiling tide of drum and bass, evoking storms, hurricanes and other assorted malevolent weather systems. Further shifts ultimately revealed what stood as another highlight: after complementary horn solos, Vandermark's tenor and Rempis' alto combined in wild careening colloquy accompanied by Daisy's frenzied drums, before the leader rounded into a forceful group finish.

It was a tough call to have to follow such a formidable opening set, but Scandinavian supergroup Atomic rose to the challenge. Combining a Swedish front line of Frederik Ljungkvist on reeds and Magnus Broo on trumpet with a Norwegian rhythm team of drummer Paal Nilssen-Love
Paal Nilssen-Love
Paal Nilssen-Love
b.1974
drums
, pianist Havard Wiik
Havard Wiik
Havard Wiik

piano
and bassist Ingebrigt Haker Flaten, Atomic featured three numbers from their recent Theater Tilters (Jazzland, 2010), as well as two new pieces, in an hour long performance.

An uncompromising start found Nilssen-Love laying down a blistering fusillade over which the trumpeter and reedman together reiterated the rapid punchy phrase from Wiik's "Fissures." Broo smeared a trumpet exhortation of half valve effects and squeals against the hyperactive drums, augmented by stabbing Morse code piano from Wiik. A sudden stop presaged a complete transformation of mood with Ljungkvist's clarinet cavorting to a lilting beat, the reedman's bending and twisting frame matching the unfolding trajectory of his musical line. Space soon appeared for a sturdy pizzicato bass feature by Haker-Flaten, eventually subsumed by a gradually heating duet for clarinet and trumpet over a freeform pulse, presaging a return to the opening theme.

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