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TUMFest--Modern Jazz in Helsinki, January '07

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Xiao-Fen took to the vocal microphone to explore another expressive avenue, inevitably bringing memories of Yoko Onos vocalizations.
The third TUMFest of contemporary and experimental music was held January 26-28 mainly in the familiar surroundings of the rococo Savoy Theatre in downtown Helsinki, a cozy venue sheltering artists and audience from the typically extreme winter conditions outside; a second venue on Sunday was the renowned Church in the Rock, an environment partly carved out of the local red granite and, as its Finnish name implies, provocatively suggestive of pagan ritual—Temppeliaukio Church. As in earlier festivals, the line-up included a mix of artists local and international, all with recent or up-coming releases with host record company, TUM, a label increasingly known for its recordings of free and avante-garde jazz, as well as its beautifully crafted cover art.

The first evening's program featured the younger and arguably more adventurous artists, in particular Kalle Kalima with K-18, and saxophonist Mats Gustaffson playing solo. Kalima set the tone for Friday evening with a series of 5 pieces inspired by different scenes in Stanley Kubrick's work, together representing a cinematic collage of urgency and intensity to be musically explored by his band members.

The four-piece ensemble featured Veli Kujala on modified, quarter-tone capable accordion, Mikko Innanen on saxophones and some percussion, and veteran classical and improvisational composer and educationalist Teppo Hauta-aho on acoustic bass and towel flapping! Drawn from films such as Full Metal Jacket, The Shining and Clockwork Orange, the excerpts permitted the band to create primarily guitar-inspired soundscapes, with dueling alto sax and accordion producing suitably eerie ambiences. Hauta-aho's antics provided some light relief from the extreme concentration of the other soloists who, despite this being their first public performance, kept the audience on the edges of their seats.

Mats Gustafsson in turn drove the audience back into their chairs with an onslaught of sound and silence, the like of which I have never experienced before even when confronted by an electric band. Picking up the free/improvisational baton from fellow Swede Peter Brötzmann, and an acknowledged student of Anthony Braxton, Gustafsson has played with many luminaries, including Derek Bailey, Paul Lovens, Paul Lytton. This evening he performed on solo baritone saxophone, apart from an opening number on slide saxophone (apparently a strange pre-war Swedish invention). The pieces ranged from the calm and sparse to the cacophonous and seemingly chaotic, leaving this listener exhausted but inspired to learn more about this curious instrument and its assertive and somewhat bizarre sound.

Last on Friday night, and in gentle contrast to the exuberance of Gustafsson, was the Mbira Trio, featuring composer and trumpeter Wadada Leo Smith, drummer Pheeroan akLaff and Min Xiao-Fen on pipa (Japanese guitar) and female vocalising. This was another adventure down experimental avenues or, more accurately, along tracks which led the listener to similar destinations as Gustafsson's, but by a different route. Trumpet led the way, supported by the steady drumming of akLaff. Challenge materialised from across the stage in the form of the amplified pipa, strutting and choking the melody line with single and multiple string runs and counter-rhythms. When the sound seemed to settle down, Xiao-Fen took to the vocal microphone to explore another expressive avenue, inevitably bringing memories of Yoko Ono's vocalisations. Another inspiring and intriguing performance.

The largest presence on the Saturday stage was surely the final act of guitarist Raoul Björkenheim, playing his own new composition The Sky is Ruby, with the local UMO Big Band's 16 members. Before this piece were two very tight performances by two very contrasting bands. First up was Ilmiliekki, the young Finnish acoustic quartet, which recently played Dizzy's Club Coca-Cola , NYC (see review). Including tracks mainly from their second album Take It With Me, TUM Records 2006, the band offered a set of neatly-arranged pieces led by their two most prominent members—trumpeter Verneri Pohjola and pianist Tuomas Prätilä.

For some listeners, Werneri's trumpet may be too hesitant or imprecise, but the corollary is his exploration of very mellow breathy sounds, which complement Prätilä's melodic piano. The rhythms of bassist Antti Lötjönen and drummer Olavi Louhivuori also deserve special mention, maintaining a discrete presence, but well capable of ratcheting up the drive power, as in Louhivuori's "Hatchi."


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