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Tord Gustavsen: Being There

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The only thing that is fundamentally important to me is to try to play music that feels as honest and true and fresh as possible.
Tord GustavsenIt's no surprise to fans of pianist Tord Gustavsen's trio that its most recent release, Being There (ECM, 2007), was selected as 2007 Album of the Year by the critics of UK's Jazz Review. Born in Norway, this jazz Viking may well be on a world crusade for soulful and meaningful music, armed only with his meditative piano and lyrical compositions.



AAJ contributor João Moreira dos Santos spoke with Gustavsen recently, about his background, how he came to be with ECM, the compositional process and future plans.

AAJ: Who is Tord Gustavsen?

Tord Gustavsen: I am a pianist and composer trying to unite beauty and emotional intensity—or, if you prefer, elegance and expressivity—in everything I do.



Biographically, I was born in Oslo, Norway [in] 1970, and grew up on the countryside in a little village before moving back to Oslo after school to study at the University of Oslo, and later at the Conservatory of music in Trondheim (the third largest city in Norway).



My main musical background was made up of lullabies, hymns and spirituals sung at home plus improvisation and composing my own songs from a very early age. Then, I worked a lot with classical piano music before going further into the specific history of jazz in my late teens and twenties.



Along with a very broad listening to folk music from many parts of the world, this makes up my musical frame of reference when I compose songs. In the trio we focus on melody and clarity almost like a pop band, on form as a contemporary music composer, and on improvisation as a modern jazz band.

AAJ: What piano players do you most admire nowadays?

TG: I actually listen more to singers and other instrumentalists than I do to pianists most of the time. My strongest inspiration comes from the great bluesy melody performers in early jazz, especially Billie Holiday and Bessie Smith, plus from Wayne Shorter, both as a composer and an improviser.



But of course I also listen to piano players—I really connect to the very important late Swedish pianist Jan Johansson, to Norwegian Jon Balke, as well as Keith Jarrett, of course. And several others: Bobo Stenson, Kevin Hays, Marcus Roberts, to mention a few. And classical pianist Till Fellner as well as the legendary Glenn Gould.

Tord Gustavsen TrioAAJ: How and when did you discover jazz?

TG: If you define jazz in the broadest possible way, as improvisation and spontaneous playing, it was my father playing the piano with me and improvising together from when I was two or three years old.



But if you define jazz in a stricter way as being necessarily connected to the American jazz history from the 1920s and forward, then I really didn't discover it until I was 18 or 19.

AAJ: Before leading your own trio you played with Norwegian singers, in particular Silje Nergaard. How much of this experience do you incorporate in your music nowadays?

TG: A good question. On the one hand, playing with the trio is completely different. Much more space, more time to stretch out (not necessarily in the most obvious sense as outgoing improvisation, more in the sense of stretching the meditative states and making more profound statements of silence and nuance).



On the other hand, I learned a lot from playing with Silje and that will always be with me. I got the experience of playing bigger stages and touring all over the world. And I learned a lot about melodic clarity, believing in miniatures and appreciating strong songwriting.

AAJ: How and when did ECM find you?

TG: We recorded most of what was to become our first trio album, Changing Places (ECM, 2003), on our own in Rainbow Studio in Oslo—I felt it was time to record with this project, but I didn't yet know where it would be released. Then, Manfred Eicher, from ECM, came to the same studio to record something else the week after, and the recording engineer played him a couple of tracks from our session.



A few days later, Manfred called me up and said he wanted to release us. We went back in the studio with him a little later and recorded three or four more tracks that were integrated with the first session, and that was the first album...

Tord Gustavsen TrioAAJ: What does recording for this prestigious label represent to you?

TG: First of all, ECM has good distribution in many parts of the world—and this is really important. It is so difficult to get the music around without an established and professional international network. But also, the series of groundbreaking and profoundly important recordings on ECM from the 1970s onwards is, of course, a very meaningful and inspiring context to be invited into. But it's better not to think too much about that, and focus on the music we want to do here and now.

AAJ: Your third CD—Being There—has a very meditative atmosphere that reminds one of enchanted forests and magical places. How much has your music been influenced by the fact that you grew up in a rural environment in Norway?

TG: That's really difficult to say—I have no way of knowing how it would have been if I grew up somewhere else. But it's safe to say that the combination of a rural environment and global culture easily available in the city nearby (and later, of course, through travels and the Internet etc.)—make for a special combination of rootedness and openness—a combination of curiosity and calmness.


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