Candido: Thousand Finger Man

By Published: | 4,438 views
No stars How we rate: our writers tend to review music they like within their preferred genres.

The late 1960s and early 1970s introduced changes to jazz as well as to all of music. Pop organ and whacka-whacka electric guitar sounds invaded the studio when Candido recorded these sessions in September 1969. This reissue with Dr. Billy Taylor’s original liner notes only measures 38 minutes in length, but its value lies in the quality; not its running time. So play it twice. Highly recommended, Thousand Finger Man is a pop album with spirit, musical accuracy and excellent sound quality.

Conguero Candido Camero was born in Havana and came to New York with Dizzy Gillespie’s encouragement. But then, that was in 1952 before history made Cuba-U.S. relations rather awkward for working musicians. Candido has had the opportunity to perform with Stan Kenton, Lionel Hampton, Elvin Jones and many others. His talent as congacero and bongocero is matched by only a few. Stepping into the spotlight frequently, Candido stirs up the band. Their well-balanced band sound includes organ, two guys splitting the electric bass chair, horns, and guitar. The title track demonstrates literally Candido’s abilities as he trades fours with the band and makes both conga drums & bongo drums talk to each other.

Track Listing: Jump Back; Come On Choo-Choo Train; Soul Limbo; Tony

Personnel: Candido Camero- congas, bongos on "Hallelujah! I

Record Label: Blue Note Records

Style: Straight-ahead/Mainstream


comments powered by Disqus
Sponsor: Summit Records | BUY NOW

Enter it twice.
To the weekly jazz events calendar

Enter the numbers in the graphic
Enter the code in this picture

Log in

One moment, you will be redirected shortly.

or search site with Google