129 Recommend It!

Talkin' Blues with John Scofield

By Published: | 11,276 views
AAJ: This makes me think of something, do you know Louie Shelton? He actually met and saw Elvis Presley when he performed at his high school.

JS: This is amazing, I know you did an article with him, and yes he came to one of my gigs in Australia and we met. We talked and he told me about his incredible life story—and that Elvis story is just unbelievable.

And I also know another guy who grew up down there and drives for this car service up here, and it was the same story, he knew Elvis and heard him at dances down there.

AAJ: Do you remember when you first discovered Jimi Hendrix?

JS: I remember it well, I was listening to a little transistor radio in my bedroom in the dark. Somebody played "Fire" and it just killed me, so I went out and bought that first record. I knew it was psychedelic rock, but I got the guitar playing. It wasn't blues, but it was somehow still the same thing.

I saw him live in New York at Hunter College in a concert with Mitch Mitchell and Noel Redding.

AAJ: A lot of the early British groups get some well-deserved credit for helping American teenagers discover the blues. A few years back a Mike Bloomfield compilation came out that included some blues demos he made way back in 1964 when he was a very young guy. It's actually pretty astonishing what he was putting down. Do you remember when he registered on your radar?

JS: You know, I remember going to the record store when the first Paul Butterfield album was out, and I just bought it without hearing it, because it looked all serious, and that's when I was first getting into blues. I don't remember what year that was, [1965] but that's really when I started getting into blues, when that album was brand new.

I think the Mike Bloomfield story is really amazing, you know he went to the South Side of Chicago with his nanny, or was it the maid. He was from a wealthy family, and to think he got to hang out with Muddy Waters when he was a kid! So yeah, Bloomfield and Butterfield were at it before the British thing was happening. You know those white kids from Chicago, they got to hear the real shit.

AAJ: What did you think of his tone and his sound?

JS: You know what, I've got to go back and listen to that again, because I haven't listened to it since way back then. But I loved that record, but I haven't gone back to reassess him. You know it's different with Clapton because he's still around, and Hendrix is still everywhere, but I haven't heard Bloomfield in so long, so I've got to go back and check it out, but in the '60s I loved it.

AAJ: What were some of the other memorable rock concerts from your teenage years?

JS: You know, I heard Cream at their first appearance in New York at the Murry the K show. He had these variety shows—three shows a day with ten bands, and each band would play two tunes. It was a holdover from the R&B days, you know like he would have Little Anthony and the Imperials and Marvin Gay. But then he started to bring in English groups like the Who and Cream, and I remember the Cream played two tunes. So I was into Clapton when that stuff was coming out.

Led Zeppelin came along too late, so I never got to see them, I wish I had. But I remember hanging out at the Roxy in Los Angeles and John Bonham was there with his roadies. I was in Billy Cobham's band at the time, this was probably 1975 and they were still around, and I remember thinking it would be cool to hang out with John Bonham, but I didn't.



I remember seeing Jeff Beck at the Fillmore with Rod Stewart on vocals. That pretty much killed me, and of course his playing with the Yardbirds had blown me away. I heard as many bands as I could.

AAJ: Did you make it up to Woodstock?

JS: No, but I had a ticket. Friday was still a school day, and my plan was that my Dad would lend me the car to go on Saturday, but by then the turnpikes were all clogged and my Dad convinced me not to go.

But you know, one of the great things about those times were that the bands played smaller gigs too. Some of the greatest stuff I saw is from Connecticut, which is where I'm from, I was 50 miles from Manhattan, so we would take the train in to hear music.

But in the suburbs we would get bands, Cream and the Doors both played at high schools in my hometown. So I heard both of those bands in a high school auditorium! I also heard the Lovin' Spoonful which was a popular band, and I remember them.

One of the greatest experiences, and a life-changing experience for me, was when Sly and the Family Stone first came out with "Dance to the Music". They played at the Longshore country club in Norwalk, Connecticut. "Dance to the Music" was on the radio and their first album was out, but I hadn't heard it. So I went to this thing, and it was a ballroom with space for about 300 people. And at this country club they kicked ass in a way I'll never forget.

That blew me away, it was unbelievable, when they started, their first tune was "Stand, " you know that anticipation counting it off, 1,2,3,4 "stand"—and that just took me on a trip.

And around that same time the Young Rascals were big, they were actually a club band in New York, and they had been playing clubs down in Brooklyn just before their album came out. Somehow they played at my high school, right before their first single came out, "I Ain't Gonna Eat Out My Heart Anymore." And that band was incredible, they were great, and talk about soul.

So they played at my high school and my friend was in the audio/visuals department and he taped it on a Wollensak reel-to-reel. I would go over to his house all the time and listen to that—I wish I had a copy of it now, it was the Rascals doing their club repertoire. It was a lot of the stuff that was on their first album like "Midnight Hour," "Mustang Sally" and all that stuff. And it was just kick-ass, and so funky.

comments powered by Disqus
Download jazz mp3 “Simply Put” by John Scofield Download jazz mp3 “Slinky” by John Scofield
  • Slinky
  • John Scofield
  • New Morning: The Paris Concert

Weekly Giveaways

Roscoe Mitchell

Roscoe Mitchell

About | Enter

Peter Lerner

Peter Lerner

About | Enter

Jamie Saft

Jamie Saft

About | Enter

Sun Trio

Sun Trio

About | Enter

Sponsor: Nonesuch Records