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Take Five With Jared C. Balogh

Take Five With Jared C. Balogh
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Meet Jared C. Balogh:
My name is Jared C. Balogh and I am a musician/composer from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania U.S.A.. I am also a member of the American Composers Forum. I formed this project back in July of 2010 with the intent to maintain an ideology that this project will push boundaries of myself and the listeners, to stray away from the rehashed and mundane and bring a revitalizing emotion to the music. I mainly create music under this project where jazz is the main foundation and where I have practically enforced no limitation of the possibilities that can be created with music. Whether it is created by improving, writing with instruments or composing in notation on music programs. Also, I have experimented with classical, drone, noise, ambient, dadaism, field recording, progressive elements solely or with a combination of jazz. I have releases on Surrism-Phonoethics, Enough Records, Happy Puppy Records, Weirdomusic/WMRecordings Wombnet (soon to be released), Classwar Karaoke, Headphonica, Sirona Records, 45 Echoes Sounds , Altered State Reflections, Itsu-Jitsu, Taped Rug Productions and Blek Blekk. I have also collaborated with artists Lezet, Hal McGee, Sean Derrick Cooper Marquardt, Kawol, Igor Amokian, The Merricks, Sinus Buds, Charles Rice Goff III and Dmah plus other from around the world over the last 20 months.

Instrument(s):
Drums, Electric and Acoustic Guitars, and Electric Bass Guitar

Teachers and/or influences?
I am self taught. All music, friends and life has influenced me in music.

I knew I wanted to be a musician when...
I played sports from 5 to 19 years old. The whole time I knew when I was playing sports I wanted to play music. I phased out sports at 19 and began playing the drums, then electric bass guitar and electric and acoustic guitar.

Your sound and approach to music:
I try to blend my influences as best as I can. I really never liked or respected musicians/bands/composers where you can easily hear their influences. My approach is pretty loose. I usually write as it comes to me. I really don't set out to have a specific writing sound. Try to tap into the moment and create as naturally as possible.

Your teaching approach:
My teaching approach is finding what best works for the person I am teaching not so much my methods. Everybody learns differently. As you are teaching you are being taught too. Finding what works for them to succeed.

Your dream band:
I don't have any particular artists in mind but I would like to be in a band where the group chemistry is always in sync plus each musician to be dynamic, versatile and open minded.

Road story: Your best or worst experience:
Being soaking wet for the whole gig because of big wind and rain storm. It was cold too!

Favorite venue:
Not one really stands out. Pretty much been treated well and environments/atmospheres were enjoyable.

Your favorite recording in your discography and why?
I like all my albums. I put the same amount of heart and soul into each one.

The first Jazz album I bought was:
My mother gave me Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits Vol. 1 on Christmas 1992. From then on I bought so many jazz albums since I can remember which was my first jazz album.

What do you think is the most important thing you are contributing musically?
I think everything. I would hope that is the approach and mindset of every musician/composer.

CDs you are listening to now:
Miles Davis—Kind Of Blue (Columbia)

John Zorn/Milford Graves—50 Anniversary (Tzadik Records)

Captain Beefheart—Trout Mask Replica (Reprise Records)

John Zorn—Voices in the Wilderness (Tzadik Records)

Captain Beefheart—Safe as Milk (Buddah Records)

Desert Island picks:
Miles Davis- Kind Of Blue (Columbia)

Captain Beefheart—Trout Mask Replica (Reprise Records)

Charles Mingus—Mingus Ah Um (Columbia)

Frank Sinatra—Live at the Sands (Reprise Records)

Dave Brubeck—Time Out (Columbia/Legacy)

How would you describe the state of jazz today?
It is obviously it is not thriving like back the 1920's-1960's but I still think it is in a healthy state. I think the large major of people in jazz are very intelligent and will always keep jazz relevant. No matter if it is mainstream or underground. Jazz presents too much to fade away. Jazz keeps expanding many new genres/styles. It continually keeps evolving. That is why I love jazz. Other genres of music pretty much don't evolve as much or not as open minded to push the genre further to new boundaries like jazz.

What are some of the essential requirements to keep jazz alive and growing?
Jazz is still cool! Many of the younger generation think jazz is not cool. It is for old people. It isn't, it is for all. To make aware that there are many different categories of jazz. That jazz is the most versatile and infinite genres in music. Jazz is Universal. Jazz targets all races, genders, income status, cultures etc....

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Download jazz mp3 “Horizontal Drift” by Jared C. Balogh Download jazz mp3 “Strides” by Jared C. Balogh
  • Strides
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Download jazz mp3 “For The Risk Of Everything (Album Sample)” by Jared C. Balogh Download jazz mp3 “Lost Without....” by Jared C. Balogh Download jazz mp3 “Pulling Myself Up Through” by Jared C. Balogh Download jazz mp3 “Bridging And Mending” by Jared C. Balogh

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