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Take Five With Dan Meinhardt

Take Five With Dan Meinhardt
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Meet Dan Meinhardt:
Dan Meinhardt is a young saxophonist quickly making a name for himself. He has made appearances with some of the Northwest's finest musicians and has been a first-call player for touring groups and pits.

In June 2012, Dan released his first album, Gone West. It contains eight original compositions and features some of the best musicians from Chicago, San Francisco and Oregon.

Dan attended Lawrence University and earned a Bachelor's degree in Saxophone Performance, graduating in 2010. After receiving a Masters in Jazz Studies, Dan returned to the Midwest and is establishing himself in Chicago as a performer, educator and composer.

Instrument(s):
Saxophone, composition.

Teachers and/or influences?
There are so many great teachers I've had the good fortune to work with. The three most influential each mark a turning point in my career. David Bixler
David Bixler
David Bixler
b.1964
saxophone
was one of the first jazz musicians to push me down this path. His approach was one of practicality and had a very old-school approach: listen, listen, listen. I still go out and see Bix any chance I get and I love hearing all of the new music he releases.

Fred Sturm was a big reason I went to Lawrence U. He helped me find my voice in a time when everything was constantly changing. He also pushed me down the composer's road. When I started my graduate work, Steve Owen at U of O became my mentor and a great friend. Steve is accomplished as a saxophonist, composer and educator—all of them at a world-class level. In addition to the great educators I've worked with, my influences keep coming from my record collection. Joe Henderson
Joe Henderson
Joe Henderson
1937 - 2001
sax, tenor
, Sonny Rollins
Sonny Rollins
Sonny Rollins
b.1930
saxophone
, Michael Brecker
Michael Brecker
Michael Brecker
1949 - 2007
sax, tenor
, Joe Lovano
Joe Lovano
Joe Lovano
b.1952
saxophone
, Joshua Redman
Joshua Redman
Joshua Redman
b.1969
saxophone
, Donny McCaslin
Donny McCaslin
Donny McCaslin
b.1966
saxophone
and Walter Smith III
Walter Smith III
Walter Smith III
b.1980
sax, tenor
have remained some of my go-to players when I need inspiration.

I knew I wanted to be a musician when...
I grew up in a musical family—my dad was a band director for years, and my mom was in musical theater. Listening to the radio and records all the time definitely pushed me in that direction. I remember a conversation with a friend in seventh grade, where we both decided we were going to be musicians. We didn't know what we would do, but we'd have something to do with music for our lives. I was one of those kids that just had to play saxophone all the time. Looking back, that hasn't changed.

Your sound and approach to music:
I just really love good music. I'm not trying to make any profound statements about jazz or music as a whole in my writing or playing, I'm just trying to make something that speaks to my audience. Whether that means a folksy melody or some kind of heady super-jazz tune, I want it to convey something to my audience. If it feels and sounds good, I feel like I've done my job as a musician. My sound reflects a lot of darker-toned tenors: there's some Henderson, Lovano, Stan Getz
Stan Getz
Stan Getz
1927 - 1991
sax, tenor
, and Redman in there. I do my best not to emulate to the point of copying, but my sound has a slight chameleon-like quality to fit the right vibe of any setting.

Your teaching approach:
I've had the good fortune of teaching a wide variety of students, and my approach has been shaped by all of them. I make all of my students improvise, jazz or not, from a beginning level on. Improvising forces you to make fast, musical decisions that inform how you can approach anything else. There's definitely focus on technique and fundamentals, but I won't ever assign something unless it has a practical application. I also incorporate transcription into all lessons. In classical and jazz playing, it's so important to hear how the greats on your instrument perform, whether it's Coltrane burning on "26-2" or Nobuya Sugawa tearing up "Tableaux."

Your dream band:
The band I had on my record is pretty close to an ideal band for me. The guys were all enthusiastic about playing my material and had great input for everything, stretching my head in different directions. I'm more curious about finding as many different musical situations as I can to play in. Different instrumentations, styles, and cultures all fascinate me, and I'd love to experience as much as I can. It'd be amazing to work with Miguel Zenon
Miguel Zenon
Miguel Zenon
b.1976
saxophone
and Wynton Marsalis
Wynton Marsalis
Wynton Marsalis
b.1961
trumpet
someday. Playing with the Village Vanguard Orchestra would be nice too.

Road story: Your best or worst experience:
I was flirting with a girl at a bar before going on with my band in Eugene, and mentioned that it was my band going on next. She asked what type of music we were playing. I told her it was "kind of like jazz, but more fun" and that she should come up with a better description and tell me after our set. I never saw her again.

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