Riviera Maya Jazz Festival: Day Two, November 26, 2010

Riviera Maya Jazz Festival: Day Two, November 26, 2010
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Day 1 | Day 2 | Day 3 | Day 4
Riviera Maya Jazz Festival
Playa del Carmen, Mexico
November 25-28, 2010

Painting in bold colors from different corners of the Latin American musical spectrum, guitarist Al Di Meola
Al Di Meola
Al Di Meola
b.1954
guitar
drew from his acclaimed, historic collaborations with Spanish guitarist Paco De Lucia
Paco De Lucia
Paco De Lucia
1947 - 2014
guitar
and Argentinean tango master Astor Piazzolla
Astor Piazzolla
Astor Piazzolla
1921 - 1992
bandoneon
for his Friday, November 26, 2010 set at the Riviera Maya Jazz Festival.

Prior to the concert, Di Meola shared thoughts on his personal guitar style. "I don't think I'm a typical 'guitaristic' guitarist. My first love was drums and percussion and instruments of a rhythmic nature," he mused. "I think this was the element that Paco liked in me—the ability to syncopate with each other while always knowing where the time was."

His surrounding band—the guitarist's longtime conguero Gumbi Ortiz
Gumbi Ortiz

bongos
(Brooklyn), guitarist Kevin Sedecki (France), drummer Peter Kaszas (Hungary), bassist Victor Miranda (Cuba), and accordionist and vocalist Fausto Beccolossi (Italy)—reflected the genuinely global nature of his World Sinfonia project. Di Meola's amplified nylon string guitar somehow sounded both warm and searing; playing with technique that surpassed impeccable, Di Meola created lush, romantic accompaniment to the beautiful Caribbean seaside surroundings. He devoted the body of his performance to flamenco and tango music, including Piazzolla's "Double Concerto," each one so strongly syncopated that the entire audience was swaying in their movement, even without a rhythm section.

The crowd shouted in recognition of the first notes of his "Mediterranean Sundance" finale, and again at his encore, "Entre Dos Aguas," one of many enduring Di Meola/de Lucia duets. "This is the first time I've played here," Di Meola roared back before leaving the stage. "We've got to come down here more often!"



Pianist Eldar Djanirov dazzled the Riviera Maya Jazz Festival with the sheer technique and beauty of his piano (and synthesizer) playing in a trio set. Born in Kyrgyzstan, and then transplanted into the Kansas City jazz scene, Djanirov performed on Marian McPartland
Marian McPartland
Marian McPartland
1918 - 2013
piano
's NPR Piano Jazz radio show when he was 11 years old (he returned when he was 18), and released his first album when he was 14. Now 23, he has released several albums for Sony Classical; his current band, with Cuban bassist Armando Gola and drummer Ludwig Afonso, came together through the recording of Virtue (Masterworks Jazz, 2009). Djanirov has also shared festival and concert stages with Dave Brubeck
Dave Brubeck
Dave Brubeck
1920 - 2012
piano
and Pat Martino
Pat Martino
Pat Martino
b.1944
guitar
.

Eldar opened with "Blue Sketch in Clave," his piano playing off the Afonso's accents while Gola connected the two like a rhythmic tightrope, the first installment of a masterfully articulate performance, especially his solo piano interludes, which belied a singular debt and commitment to classical piano and jazz improvisation. Eldar's second tune, "Exposition," seemed to honor the light Latin colors and tones of Chick Corea
Chick Corea
Chick Corea
b.1941
piano
. He also played the timeless "Bésame Mucho," which he described as "just a beautiful, pure melody." Altogether, Djanirov's performance offered expertly played styles expressed through his surprisingly self-possessed musical vision. "Music has no boundaries," Eldar explained. "Showmanship has culture and boundaries. But music has no boundaries."

Fronted by three vocalists, but led by guitarist Jean-Paul "Bluey" Maunick, soul-jazz ensemble Incognito
Incognito
Incognito
b.1957
band/orchestra
shared great respect for R&B traditions from both sides of the Atlantic in its Friday evening headline performance. "Jazz was created, first of all, for people to dance. It was for people in America to go out and party down," Bluey said before the show. "Jazz is not the blues. This is the element of jazz that I've chosen to embrace."

"Thank you for this invitation to your beautiful party!" he shouted to the listeners gathered on the beach, while Incognito assembled onstage. The group spent its set ensuring that the party did not stop, with Bluey's song introductions and explanations guiding the audience through Incognito's performance like a benevolent DJ. The collective groove began in the formative 1970s, with Bluey's Earth Wind & Fire homage, "1975" (the first year that Bluey saw EW&F in concert), a tribute to Stevie Wonder
Stevie Wonder
Stevie Wonder
b.1950
keyboard
, and Boz Scaggs
Boz Scaggs
Boz Scaggs
b.1944
guitar
' sophisticated "Lowdown" blues. Wonder proved a recurring theme, as the band later ripped off hot and heavy verses of "Higher Ground" and "Don't You Worry 'Bout a Thing."

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