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Punkt Festival 2009: Day 3, Kristiansand, Norway, September 4, 2009

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Day 1 | Day 2 | Day 3 | Day 4


With the musical laboratory that's Punkt Live Remix, it's sometimes possible for a remix to actually surpass its source performance. With (for the most part) Punkt Co-Artistic Directors Jan Bang and Erik Honoré listening to each performance while it's in progress from their vantage point in the Alpha Room, they get to hear and select the individual tracks that they think would be ripe for use, sometimes stripping away any potential weak points. Not that Punkt's regular programming in the Agder Theatre's main hall has much in the way of weak points, but there are instances where the remix artists manage to take something good and make it even better; or, in at least one case on Day Three, something wonderful and make it positively sublime.



It's a good thing the music and other Punkt activities are indoors, however, as for the first year since AAJ began covering Punkt in 2006, the weather has been less than cooperative. Day Two saw a positively torrential downpour that lasted for hours and caused some flooding in parts of town. It's also a good thing, then, that the festival hotel is just around the corner from the Agder Theatre, although even making that brief trek at the height of the downpour was something to be avoided.

Punkt Festival 09



Day Three, while not exactly a return to the sunny weather that's been a companion of the festival in previous years, was certainly an improvement, with only light rain, and even the occasional streak of sunlight coming through the occasionally breaking cloud cover. But once the shows begin at 6:00 PM, the weather really doesn't matter; as long as there's no disruption in power, people in attendance at the festival could be anywhere and they'd never know anything was going on outside the four walls of the building.

Chapter Index

  1. Punkt Seminars: Sidsel Endresen / Pål Strangefruit Nyhus
  2. Anne Marie Almedal
  3. Live Remix: Guy Sigsworth, Jan Bang, Erik Honoré
  4. Sweet Billy Pilgrim
  5. Live Remix: Arve Henriksen, Jan Bang, Erik Honoré
  6. Susanna & The Magical Orchestra
  7. Live Remix: J. Peter Schwalm, Erlend Dahlen, Eivind Aarset



Punkt Seminars: Sidsel Endresen / Pål Strangefruit Nyhus



In order to broaden the appeal and the purpose of Punkt, the festival began running daytime seminars in its second year, but it was only in its third year that it began running them in English, recruiting people like Gavin Bryars in 2008. This year, the range is wide, covering everything from film editing and producing big names to getting intimate with the process of developing a unique improvisational voice...and disco.

Punkt Festival 09 / Sidsel Endresen



Sidsel Endresen

Sidsel Endresen
Sidsel Endresen

vocalist
has been a Punkt fixture since its inception, and her groundbreaking work with many of its key Norwegian family tree was, in fact, one of the things that set the stage for Punkt to come into existence. For her Punkt Seminar, Endresen discussed the nature of improvisation, but before she got into the nitty gritties, she got her attendees singing; as good an entry point into what it is she does as any.



Most intriguing and enlightening was time spent explaining how she has developed her unique approach to vocal improvisation, one which seems to overflow with so many individual ideas that unpicking it seems like an overwhelming task. Surprisingly like a good project manager, Endresen has spent years breaking down her ideas into their smallest kernels, or "cells," as she called them. Then no small amount of time is spent honing each individual cell to the point where it's fully integrated as a part of her repertoire, so that she can call upon it at will and without having to think...at least, not too hard, as the ever-present challenge of balancing head and heart remains a clear focus for the intrepid singer.



"If it's too much here," she said, pointing to her heart, "it's completely therapeutic; if it's too much here," she then said, pointing to her head, "it's uninspired." Finding the right mix is not an unusual goal, but it was fascinating to hear Endresen talk about her evolving a vocal style in the absence of any formal methodology, creating her own instead. People forget that honing the voice is no different than with any other musical instrument, and that no small amount of it has to be about clinical practice, distanced from the multitude of musical reference points that continue to inform her music, but in less than overt ways—"like sleeping knowledge," as she described it.

Punkt Festival 09 / Pal Strangefruit NyhusUnlike Endresen's open window into her own developmental process, Pål "Strangefruit" Nyus' seminar was less about his own development and more a lecture—albeit one with plenty of musical examples—about how disco music evolved and how, despite the bad rap it's had ever since the days of a record burning extravaganza in an American football field in the late 1970s and, of course, the famous "Disco Sucks" shirts, it really was the precedent for later styles like house, hip hop and techno. As far as Nyhus is concerned, all of the above are really disco; the essentials are not dissimilar, only the name has changed.



A veritable encyclopedia of disco-fact, Nyhus talked about how the form emerged, beginning in the early 1970s, in American gay communities, and how artists like Dr. John

Dr. John
Dr. John
b.1940
piano
and Manu Dibango
Manu Dibango
Manu Dibango
b.1934
saxophone
made records that were early disco discs—and, based on the samples he played, it was hard not to hear his point. That the term "disco" simply emerged as music being played in discotechs, and that "house" emerged out of music being played at a Chicago underground club called "The Warehouse," was not lost on Nyhus' audience.



Nyhus also talked about the emergence of DJs ("disc jockeys, does anyone see the connection?" he asked rhetorically) and early low-tech extensions of a song for the dance floor by DJs with two copies of the same song on two turntables—a concept that led logically to early remixes which, in many cases, sold better than the original recordings, much to the chagrin of record producers everywhere.



Nyhus was just getting into the concept of remixing in the modern world with contemporary technology when, with time running out, he had to stop. Carrying on a conversation after the seminar, where he expressed the hopes that he could have had more time, what became immediately clear was that his knowledge of the subject is so detailed (and, by all accounts, his music collection so vast and comprehensive) that he'd have been able to do a week-long seminar.


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