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  • Bruce V Conway wrote on March 02, 2008 report

    My theory is that Bud Shank is not aware how good he sounds on flute.

    Also, that the sax playing actually helps the flute playing (tone-wise) - gives it more strength.

    I've never heard a better jazz player on flute than Bud - very rich tone. Then again, it's also difficult to find a better alto player than Bud.

    But, I can see why one would want to switch to sax. You can get a whole lot of character (different tone colours, emotions, screeches, howls, groans, whatever) out of a saxophone. I think Bud had a unique way of trasferring all this over to the flute as well - lovely round tone. A classical player would compare it to Marcel Moyse - the very king of flute tone classically.

    As for the flute never meant to be a jazz instrument. I think all that disappeared with amplification.

    Bruce (flute, tenor sax)
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jazzflutist

  • alison wrote on March 11, 2012 report

    I think he was simplifying his life, as one tends to do as one gets older, in order to focus on what's really important, one's roots and first inspiration. He picked up the flute to be more versatile, to stay alive... in the LA recording studios, more out of financial necessity perhaps than anything else. That arrangement ended when he reached the point where he only needed to please himself.